Skógafoss, Iceland - Popular for a Reason Skip to content

Skógafoss, Iceland – Popular for a Reason

By Þórunn Arnaldsdóttir

Photo: Photo: Golli. Skógafoss on a beautiful, sunny day.

Skógafoss waterfall is one of those instantly recognisable landmarks in Iceland that has been used in countless movies and advertisements to showcase the natural beauty of the countryside. Nevertheless, it is striking in person and should not be missed if given the opportunity. Skógafoss is a popular attraction on most tours around the southside of Iceland and it’s easy to find an accessible group tour that includes a stopover there. For those who want to travel on their own, Skógafoss is about two hours away from Reykjavík on a straight drive down Þjóðvegur 1 highway. It is located in Rangárþing eystra, south of Eyjafjallajökull glacier.

The Legendary Skógafoss

Skógafoss is around 60 m high and 25 m wide, making it one of the biggest waterfalls in Iceland and while it’s usually viewed from below, there is a trail close by that leads up to the cliffs above that offers impressive views down the cascading water. Legend has it that one of the first Vikings in Iceland buried a treasure behind the waterfall that was later partially recovered and given to a nearby church for savekeeping. Today, a ring from the treasure trove is found in a museum at Skógar, a small village close to Skógafoss. Along the river Skógá, from where Skógafoss falls, are a number of smaller waterfalls that are worth the hike up to enjoy, along with impressive views over the South Coast. Skógar village is a short twenty minute walk from Skógafoss and is a great little place to stop for coffee or a meal and unwind from the thunderous vistas. Although small, the village has a number of accommodation options for those who want to extend their stay, and at least one of them, Hótel Skógafoss offers a nice view directly at the waterfall. 

Photo: Golli. The Skógar Museum close to Skógafoss

Skógafoss and Beyond

Skógafoss is only one of many attractions in this area of the south that includes the Seljavallalaug hot pool and Seljalandsfoss waterfall. It also marks the beginning of the hike up Fimmvörðuháls, a 22 km trail between glaciers Eyjafjallajökull and Mýrdalsjökull. The hike takes about 11-14 hours but because of its great accessibility it’s one of the most popular hikes in the country. Close by is also the iconic Þórsmörk, a breathtaking highland valley with beautiful hiking trails. There’s a reason why some places are used to advertise Iceland and it’s safe to say no one will be disappointed with a visit to Skógafoss and the surrounding area.

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