Efling Union Workers to Vote on Strike

Strike efling hotel workers union

Janitorial staff in Efling Union will vote on strike action starting this Monday. If approved, cleaners in the Reykjavík capital area would strike on March 18. Efling representatives say the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise (SA) breached trust in ongoing collective agreement negotiations by reopening salary negotiations with other unions.

Efling is Iceland’s second-largest worker’s union. Efling’s negotiating committee did not attend a meeting at the State Mediator’s office yesterday and are not expected to attend today’s meeting between negotiating parties. Efling representatives assert that SA offered other unions with the Confederation of Labour (ASÍ) higher salary hikes than previously negotiated without consulting with Efling.

Read More: Unions Split on Wage Negotiations

If approved, the strike would involve around 1,000 workers, according to Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, chairperson of Efling.

New Tourism Campaign Prompts Criticism

Locals and tourists enjoy the sunshine in Reykjavík's Austurvöllur square.

A new collaborative project aimed at promoting tourism in Iceland, called “Good Hosts,” has drawn vocal criticism from Efling union chairperson Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir.

The project was announced Friday, July 14th, with Minister of Tourism Lilja Dögg Alfreðsdóttir, Chairperson of the Tourist Service Association Bjarnheiður Hallsdóttir, Director of Tourism Arnar Már Ólafsson publishing the project’s website on social media.

The project aims to encourage Icelanders to embrace the important role of being “good hosts.” According to the project website, “the hospitality of the nation is a significant part of creating a positive experience for tourists in Iceland. Together, we are a part of some of the most valuable moments for people on their journey. We all enjoy the benefits of tourist visits. We can thank the vibrant tourism industry for its diverse services and outstanding hospitality throughout the country. The visits of these enthusiastic guests have made our society more diverse and enjoyable.”

The project additionally calls upon individuals and companies to take part in a “good host pledge.”

The project, however, has drawn criticism from some, including Efling union chairperson Sólveig Anna. In a recent post, Sólveig Anna recalls the strikes earlier this year during a particularly contentious contract negotiation:

“Last winter, Bjarnheiður Hallsdóttir claimed that the tourism industry was in ruins following COVID. She accused Efling, a union representing low-wage workers in the capital area, of manufacturing a disaster […] She also expressed concerns that if Efling’s members went on strike, exercising their constitutional right, inflation would increase, and people would become unemployed. In essence, she portrayed the legitimate and self-evident fight of low-wage workers, mostly immigrants, for a better life, as a criminal attack on the well-being of all Icelanders […] Now Bjarnheiður wants to compel all of us to promote our beautiful country for her […] She wants us all to help her sell our homeland so she can become richer.”

Among the benefits of the recent growth in Icelandic tourism, the project highlights 25,770 jobs that have been created, in addition to increased services for the entire nation.

 

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Efling and SA Negotiations Over: “No Choice But to Accept”

Samningar Verkföll Sátti

Fréttablaðið reports that Efling chairperson Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir has accepted the most recent mediation proposal.

Voting closed today, March 8, for the latest off in the prolonged negotiation between Eflind trade union and SA, the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise.

Read more: Results on New Mediating Proposal Expected Soon

With voting closed, preliminary results indicate that a majority of Efling members voted in favour of the proposal. Among other benefits, the average monthly wage of Efling employees will increase by about ISK 42,000 ($295; €280), an increase of about 11%. The contract will be retroactively valid through November of last year, and valid until January 2024.

“The result is in line with what I and my colleagues in the negotiation committee had counted on. I have been in contact with a number of members and conveyed the message to them that both I and the negotiation committee had no other choice in the situation but to agree to this mediation proposal,” Sólveig Anna stated to Fréttablaðið. She continued: “Of course, I fully understand that Efling members want this to end. It’s clear it wasn’t possible to get a better deal.”

According to Fréttablaðið, some 22.8% of Efling members took part in the vote. Of those, 84% voted to accept the latest proposal.

 

 

What’s the Status of the Efling Negotiations?

efling strikes iceland

Update: As of March 8, negotiations between Efling and SA have been concluded. Read more about the contract here.

Strikes, short-lasted and contentious negotiations, and now a pending lockout against the Efling trade union have been in the news lately, leaving many who don’t follow Icelandic wage negotiations wondering: what, exactly, is happening on the Icelandic labour market?

Current status

All workers’ strikes have been postponed while Efling members vote on a mediating proposal put forth by the state mediator on March 1. Voting closes at 10:00 AM on March 8. The lockout proposed by the Icelandic Confederation of Enterprise (SA) has been postponed until March 9, meaning it could still be instituted if Efling members reject the mediating proposal.

Leadup to negotiations

In the fall of 2022, around one-third of all labour contracts in Iceland expired and needed to be renegotiated. Amidst upsets in the leadership of the Confederation of Icelandic Labour (ASÍ) and a particularly difficult combination of high inflation and interest rates, the round of contract negotiations was particularly fraught. Given the recent increases in cost of living, it was also an especially important round to ensure quality of life for workers. Most major trade unions were able to reach compromises with the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise (SA), mostly in the form of shorter-term contracts. These short-term contracts will be renegotiated with SA when conditions are hopefully less difficult.

Playing hardball

One major holdout has been Efling Union, led by chairperson Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir. Efling is the second-largest workers’ union in Iceland and represents some of the lowest-paid workers in the country. Efling has leveraged the difficult negotiating climate to agitate for more substantial wage increases.

State mediator Aðalsteinn Leifsson, whose task was to bring the negotiations between SA and Efling to a productive end, attempted to force a vote within Efling by submitting similar conditions approved by Efling’s peer unions directly to the union membership, circumventing what many see as an overtly militant leadership. Legal wrangling delayed the request and ultimately led to the appointment of a new, temporary, state mediator: Ástráður Haraldsson.

Workers’ strikes

Since early February, Efling members have approved several strike actions, mostly affecting hotels in the Reykjavík capital area. February 20 saw a significant escalation in the tensions between SA and Efling, when Efling’s suspended strikes resumed at midnight. In addition to the original 700 striking hotel workers, other labourers (most significantly among them, truck drivers) have resumed their strikes. As of the time of writing, some 2,000 Efling members are on strike. Efling has, however, postponed a strike among additional workers (in hotels, security services, and janitorial services) that was set to begin on February 28.

Confederation of Enterprise approves lockout

On February 22, SA announced that its members had voted overwhelmingly in favour of a lockout of Efling workers set to begin on March 2. CEO of SA Halldór Benjamín Þorbergsson called it a “last resort” to force the conclusion of a collective agreement with Efling Union. Efling Chairperson Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir accused SA of using the lockout to force the government to step into the conflict.

The pending lockout would affect all members of Efling, around 21,000 in total, neither allowing them to show up to work, receive a wage, or accrue benefits and leave.

Unclear whether union would support locked-out workers

The pending lockout could leave Efling members in a tight spot as the union’s leaders appear to disagree on whether to make payouts to affected workers. While Efling’s regulations do not prevent the union from making payouts to members affected by a lockout, a notice on Efling’s website states “the union does not hold responsibility for a lockout and the labour dispute fund cannot sustain such payments.”

Efling’s labour dispute fund allocates approximately ISK 25,000 [$174, €164] per worker per day and has been used to pay the 2,000 or so members who were striking. In the case of a lockout, however, Efling would need to support ten times that number, and its funds would reportedly run out in a week.

Some have interpreted SA’s lockout as an attempt to intimate Efling into accepting their demands, and if not, to quickly burn through Efling’s labour dispute fund and force the union back to the negotiating table.

Impact felt at the pump and in hotels

Strikes among Efling workers, now postponed, impacted Icelandic business and society in various ways. A strike among oil truck drivers was felt at the pump in late February, when petrol supplies gradually began to deplete. Several hotels were temporarily closed due to workers strikes.’

Lockout postponed

In light of a meeting scheduled for February 27 between Efling and SA, SA has postponed the potential lockout pending further developments. Originally scheduled to begin Thursday, March 2, the potential lockout will now begin March 6, if no agreement is reached.

At the same time, Kristján Þórður Snæbjarnarson, chairperson of ASÍ, has stated that the planned lockout is potentially illegal on grounds of formal defects in the original notice, in addition to the problem of jurisdiction. According to statements from Kristján Þórður, SA members from outside the capital voted on the proposed measure, rendering it illegitimate. Because Efling trade union exclusively represents workers in the capital region, only capital area members of SA should have been allowed to vote on the matter.

On March 6, the Labour Court ruled in SA’s favour, deeming the lockout legal.

Vote on new proposal approved, strikes and lockouts postponed

Temporarily-appointed state mediator Ástráður Haraldsson called a press conference at 10:00 AM on Wednesday, March 1. He told reporters that representatives from the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise (SA) and the Efling union had approved of his new mediating proposal and that all ongoing and impending strikes and lockouts would be postponed while voting took place.

Voting began on Friday, March 3, at noon, and will conclude on Wednesday, March 8. The lockout and all strikes have been postponed in the meantime.

This is a developing story and will be regularly updated. For more context on the labour situation in Iceland, listen to Deep North Episode 8: Wage Negotiations.

Voting on New Mediating Proposal “the Right Decision”

Samningar Verkföll Sátti

Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, Chair of the Efling union, believes that putting the state mediator’s new proposal to a vote was “the right decision.” Sólveig told Vísir that claiming that any kind of victory had been achieved was preposterous, given that  SA had been unwilling to negotiate directly with Efling.

Lockouts and strikes postponed

After temporarily-appointed state mediator Ástráður Haraldsson announced this morning that Efling and SA had agreed to vote on a new mediating proposal – and that all ongoing and impending strikes and lockouts would be postponed – Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, the Chair of the Efling union, shared her reaction to the proposal with the media.

In an interview with Vísir, Sólveig stated that she was unwilling to say whether or not she recommended that Efling members vote in favour of the new proposal – but that it was, nevertheless, “the right decision to hold a vote;” the impending lockout and wage improvements for maids and truck drivers were among the reasons why Efling’s negotiating committee had agreed to vote on the proposal.

“This is a legally presented media proposal. It is, of course, clear that SA does not intend, and will not sign a collective agreement with Efling,” Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir commented.

Asked what it was in the mediator’s proposal that convinced Efling’s negotiating committee to put it to a vote, Sólveig Anna referred to the fact, among other things, that hotel maids and Samskip drivers would be moved up a pay bracket; that an agreement had been reached with the employers of striking drivers regarding a bonus for transporting hazardous material; and that full retroactivity of the wage agreement had been negotiated (active from November of last year).

“Being presented with this legal mediation proposal, given that there was this devastating lockout on the horizon, I – as the chair of this association, and as the chair of the negotiating committee – […] felt that, in a conversation with the committee, that this was something on which our members could vote. And I believe it is the right decision,” Sólveig Anna told Vísir.

Up to Efling members to decide

Sólveig Anna also told Vísir that although she was unwilling to say, as previously noted, whether she would recommend that Efling members vote on the proposal, she would do her job: “Of course, I will do what I have to do as Efling Chair, and as the chair of the negotiating committee, which is to clarify what has happened – to clearly explain the content of the proposal, alongside anything else that was discussed yesterday. It is then up to the members themselves to decide how they vote,” Sólveig Anna explained.

Sólveig was likewise unwilling to speculate whether the new proposal would serve to end the wage dispute; if she had signed a collective agreement that she and the negotiating committee had struck, and with which they were happy, then she would have certainly encouraged members to vote in favour of it.

“There are simply different rules to the game when it comes to a mediating proposal, but I will, as I’ve stated, do my job,” Sólveig Anna observed.

Strikers “the real heroes” of the labour movement

Sólveig Anna reiterated her displeasure with the fact that SA had refused to enter into a collective agreement with Efling. Labour improvements had been made for staff, including hotel maids and drivers, who had been willing to strike. However, Sólveig noted, no one could claim that any kind of victory had been achieved, given that it had proved impossible to reach a collective agreement – and that a mediation proposal had been the only way forward.

Efling had, however, won certain smaller victories when it came to the dispute: the organisational and fighting power of the union was obvious to everyone: “These are the real heroes of the Icelandic labour struggle: low-wage workers who show that they know what they’re worth,” Sólveig Anna remarked.

Sólveig also considered the fact that Efling had not been forced to hand over its electoral roll (i.e. membership registry) to the Office of the State Mediator, in order to vote on Aðalsteinn Leifsson’s initial mediation proposal – which Sólveig Anna described as “illegal” – as a victory.

Given the state of the dispute, Efling’s negotiating committee believed that it was impossible to continue. SA was “ready to do everything in its power” to avoid entering into a collective agreement with Efling and “deprive the company of its independent bargaining rights.”

“It would be absurd for anyone to perceive that as a victory,” she stated.

A warning for the future

Finally, Sólveig Anna warned the members of the labour market not to act against Efling in the future:

“I truly hope that those parties within the Icelandic labour market who have lobbied for the union to be deprived of its independent bargaining rights will think twice before doing it again,” said Sólveig Anna, who described Efling as “the most powerful labour union in the country.”

Not Paying Workers During Lockout is Sólveig’s Decision, Efling Vice-Chair Says

Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir

There are no regulations that prevent Efling Union from paying workers during the lockout set to begin on March 2, according to the union’s Vice-Chair Agnieszka Ewa Ziółkowska. The statement contrasts with previous assertions from the union’s Chairperson Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, who has stated that Efling would not make payouts to workers in the case of a lockout. In a post on her Facebook page, Agnieszka stated not providing financial support to workers affected by the lockout would be Sólveig’s personal decision, and criticised Sólveig for being “willing to have her low-wage members suffer.”

The Icelandic Confederation of Enterprise (SA) has approved a lockout of some 20,000 workers set to begin on March 2, the latest escalation in a fraught collective agreement negotiation between SA and Efling. During the lockout, Efling workers would not be permitted to show up to their employment. As such, they would not receive wages, accrue leave, or receive pension payments. Efling is currently paying striking members from its labour dispute fund, but a notice from the union stated that it would not make payments in the case of a lockout. According to the notice, “the union does not hold responsibility for a lockout and the labour dispute fund cannot sustain such payments.”

“The members of Efling have the right to know that the rules of the union aren’t stopping their chairman from paying from the fund in the case of the [lockout],” Agnieszka wrote on Facebook. “Its just her decision.” Agnieszka added that paying workers affected by the lockout was the “right thing” to do.

Confederation of Enterprise to Vote on Lockout Against Efling

efling strike iceland

The board of SA, the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise, has agreed to present a vote to its member companies to initiate a lockout against the members of the Efling trade union.

According to SA chairperson Halldór Benjamín Þorbergsson, SA members will be presented with a vote today. Stating that negotiations with Efling have gone as far as they can, the potential lockout would represent an escalation of the so-far unproductive negotiations between the two labour organisations. If the lockout goes through, it would potentially affect the entire Efling membership, some 20,000 workers. Efling is one of the largest trade unions in Iceland and a lockout against the union would have significant effects on the entire economy.

Read More: No Postponement of Strikes

Halldór was careful to note in a statement that the tactic has been used sparingly by SA throughout the decades, but that the uncooperative tactics in use by Efling have forced his hand. He has been quoted as referring to the vote as an “emergency measure.”

“In short, SA can initiate a lockout, just like Efling can threaten a strike,” Halldór clarified. “When the vote is over, and let’s assume it’s approved, we will hand over a document to the leadership of Efling notifying them of the lockout. The state mediator will also receive a copy. Just like in the case of strikes, it has seven days to be implemented. We believe that we have reached such a critical moment in this dispute that we can no longer allow Efling to paralyze society as a whole with a hand-picked group of employees.”

Halldór likewise stated that the vote would concern all members of Efling, but that a potential lockout will be implemented with specific regard to the conditions SA members find most suitable.

Read More: Efling Suspends Strikes

The vote comes after threats by Efling chairperson to resume strikes, which had been postponed, on Sunday.

Locked-out workers would not be allowed to show up to their usual employment. As such, they would not receive wages, accrue leave, or receive pension payments.

Efling Suspends Strikes, Talks to Resume at 10 AM

Efling union

Efling’s negotiating committee has postponed all strikes until Sunday. The Director of SA’s Labour Market Division says no victory has been won; the postponements are primarily a way to ensure peace to negotiate, RÚV reports. Talks are set to resume 10 AM Friday.

The suspension of strikes not a victory

Efling’s negotiating committee has agreed to postpone all strikes until Sunday so that “formal talks” can begin with the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise (SA). Ástráður Haraldsson, temporarily appointed state mediator, told RÚV that a decision had been made to impose a media ban on the negotiating committees and that the plan was to conclude the talks this weekend. Whether or not the negotiations would prove successful would have to be seen.

Ragnar Árnason, Director of SA’s Labour Market Division, clarified that the postponement of strikes was not an upshot of the negotiations but was primarily about ensuring peace to work: It is difficult to call people to a meeting when they’re busy monitoring strikes and putting out fires in their places of work.

Ragnar stated that SA requested that the strikes be postponed longer but that the decision was up to Efling and SA was not in a position to make further demands. “We’ll see what the next few days bring, that is if we have to postpone strikes again if things go well this weekend.” Ragnar does not consider the suspension of strikes a victory; companies had suffered a lot of damage during the cessation of work.

The right decision at this time

Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, Chair of Efling, told RÚV that the union’s negotiating committee had weighed the decision to postpone strikes for “a long time.” The committee had concluded that this was the right thing to do, given the situation. “We would never have made this decision unless we believed that talks were progressing, that something was happening, that there was something to be gained.”

Sólveig added that things would clear up soon enough. Efling would attend tomorrow’s meeting and the negotiating committee was prepared to hold discussions for as long as necessary. She admitted that it had been a difficult decision to postpone the strikes because strikes are “their weapons.” “They’ve gotten us to this place; we’re headed towards real wage negotiations.”

No Postponement of Strikes Without Meaningful Offer

Sólveig Anna

Representatives of the Efling union and the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise (SA) attended a meeting with temporarily appointed state mediator Ástráður Haraldsson at 10 AM this morning. Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, Chair of Efling, stated that the union would not consider postponing strikes unless a meaningful offer was made, Vísir reports.

No postponement without a meaningful offer

Ástráður Haraldsson began meeting with the two disputing parties at 9 AM yesterday. After a long day of discussion, Ástráður told the media that they were still trying to determine whether there was a basis for actual, substantive wage negotiations.

In an article in Morgunblaðið today, SA stated that postponing strikes was the basis for continued negotiations.

Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir responded to this statement in an interview with Vísir this morning. “Efling will not postpone strike action unless a meaningful offer is made by SA; there really would have to be some meat on the bones in that respect.”

When asked if she was optimistic about the negotiations, Sólveig was unwilling to say: “Let’s see. I don’t really know what will happen in the next few hours. The Efling negotiation committee and I hope, as we have always hoped, that Efling agreements will be signed with Efling members.”

Unwise to rely on government intervention

Eyjólfur Árni Rafnsson, the Chair of SA – who will be leading the negotiations on behalf of SA in the absence of the indisposed Halldór Benjamín Þorbergsson – told Vísir that he had first read about SA’s demand regarding the postponement strikes in the news this morning. He had not made such a statement himself.

“We are sitting down at 10 AM. I hope it will be a long day. The fact that negotiations are taking place is remarkable. If it’s a short day, it’s not as remarkable.”

When asked about the rather combative statements that were being made by the opposing camps, and if it wasn’t advisable to spare them, Eyjólfur Árni replied: “Sure, it’s always best to show constraint. We are sitting down to talk. We’re going to throw ourselves into this wholeheartedly.”

Eyjólfur Árni concluded by saying that it was SA’s role to work towards agreements as opposed to relying on a possible intervention from the government.

Labour Talks: Yesterday’s Long Meeting Inconclusive, Mediator Reticent

Ástráður, Halldór Benjamín

At 9 AM yesterday morning, the negotiating committees of the Efling union and the Confederation of Icelandic Enterprise (SA) attended their first meetings with the new, temporarily-appointed state mediator, Ástráður Haraldsson.

Just before the meeting began, Ástráður told reporters that, so long as there was some good to be had, he was prepared to meet late into the evening. And meet he did; it was not until 10 PM that same day that the negotiating parties decided to call it a day. The disputing parties are set to meet again at 10 AM this morning.

Below you will find a brief recap, in broad strokes, of yesterday’s events.

The meeting commences

Prior to stepping into the meeting with SA and the temporarily-appointed state mediator, Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir, Chair of the Efling union, told RÚV that she was happy with the new mediator: “We are very happy to have gotten him involved in this dispute for we feel he is willing to listen to our point of view.”

Halldór Benjamín Þorbergsson, Director General of SA, was not quite as upbeat during an intermission at noon. Speaking to RÚV, Halldór stated that it was “too early to tell how the negotiations between SA and Efling were progressing.” He clarified that the mediator had been meeting separately with the two disputing parties, hoping to find some middle ground.

Asked if he was hopeful, Halldór Benjamín replied with a simple “no.” “I realise our responsibility to society and the enormous financial damage that will be done to the economy in the coming days.”

At the time, Halldór Benjamín expected the meeting to last into the afternoon.

Solidarity meeting at Harpa

While Halldór Benjamín spoke to the media at noon, a large group of people had gathered at the Northern Lights Hall (Norðurljósarsalur) at the Harpa Music and Conference Hall. Efling was hosting a solidarity meeting; a strike, involving, on the one hand, 500 employees of the hotel chains Berjaya and Edition, and, on the other hand, about 70 employees at Samskip, Skeljungur, and Olíudreifing, had officially come into effect at noon. Efling members were there to confirm their participation in the strike and register for payments from the strike fund, which amounts to ISK 25,000 ($173 / €162) per day.

Gas stations busy

At 2.30 PM, Vísir reported that the oil company N1 had closed the delivery of petrol and diesel at several stations in the Southwest corner of Iceland. The outlet reported that gas stations in the capital area were expected to run dry over the coming 24 hours; earlier that day and yesterday, some customers had arrived to stations with large containers to stock up on petrol. The fire brigade later issued a warning, advising against the hoarding of petrol.

Halldór leaves the meeting – on account of the flu

At 5 PM, Halldór Benjamín walked out of his meeting with Efling and the state mediator. But not because talks had stranded. He was feeling under the weather. He told a reporter from RÚV he felt “a pain in his neck, was a bit restless, and was advised to go home.”

The reported, Arnar Björnsson, inquired if his indisposedness derived from being made to swallow any nauseating suggestions. Halldór laughed.

The issue at hand

As noted by RÚV, the gap separating the two disputing parties is not, on the face of it, wide. SA had refused to waver from their offer of a collective agreement similar to the one signed by other unions of the Federation of General and Special Workers in Iceland (SGS). The agreement included a general rate increase of ISK 32-52,000 ($222-381 / €207-356) per month. SA had repeatedly stated that it was “out of the question” to offer Efling a different and better contract than other unions.

Before the last real negotiation meeting on January 10, Efling submitted an offer of rate increases in the range of ISK 40-59,000 ($277-409 / €259-382) per month. Additionalliy, the union demanded an ISK 15,000 ($104 / €97) increase in the so-called cost-of-living compensation.

Sólveig Anna stated that the offer still stood and, prior to the meeting yesterday morning, noted that the gap between the parties was not that wide. “It’s not that far apart in terms of money. It’s about [SA’s] pride and whether they are going to let it work for the interests of Efling’s 20,000 members,” she told RÚV.

Proper talks could begin

At 5 PM, Ástráður Haraldsson told reporters that, in his opinion, there was a possibility of engaging in “real collective bargaining negotiations” in the dispute between Efling and SA. He had spent the entire day with the negotiation committees of SA and Efling, meeting each of them separately, although he did not consider “proper talks” having actually begun.

“We’ve been trying to discover the nature of such talks and whether it would be possible to engage in such talks,” Ástráður told RÚV.

Talks renewed at 8 PM

At 6 PM – during a break in the meeting – Eyjólfur Árni Rafnsson, Chair of SA, stepped in for his indisposed colleague and offered an interview to reporters. He told the media that he considered it “overly optimistic” to expect that collective agreements would be signed on that day. Nevertheless, he admitted, it was a “positive sign” whenever people sat down to talk.

At that point, the meeting, which had been going on intermittently since 9 AM, was the longest in the wage dispute to date. Eyjólfur observed that that was “a good thing.”

The meeting resumed at 8 PM, with Ástráður Haraldsson hinting to reporters that the meeting “might run long.” When the meeting began again, Eyjólfur Árni stated: “We’re going to find out if we can see eye to eye and whether we can enter into real negotiations to put this to and end.” Eyjólfur Árni was unwilling to say what exactly SA had proposed, other than that those things that were being discussed with the union were things that SA “would have liked to have discussed in January.”

Meetings finally come to a close

After a long day of meetings, the final sessions finally concluded between 10-11 PM yesterday. Another meeting has been called at 10 AM today.

“We are still in this opening phase and have not managed to enter into actual wage negotiations,” Ástráður Haraldsson told RÚV following the meeting.

As noted by RÚV, although the Efling strikes had only lasted twelve hours, people had already begun stocking up on medicine. The Director of Lyfja, a retail pharmacy, told RÚV yesterday that there was no need for people to stock up on medicines. “There is several months’ supply of medicines in the country, at any given time. Medicines are also, in some cases, life-saving products, and we have received exemptions to carry out this extremely important role of health services, i.e. the distribution of medicines,” Sigríður Margrét Oddsdóttir told RÚV.