Divers Collect Trash in Silfra Fissure

Two people scuba diving in Silfra Fissure

A small group of divers collected trash from the Sifra fissure in Þingvellir National Park this weekend, Vísir reports. The group started its trash-collecting project in April, diving for trash off the coast of the town of Garður on the Reykjanes peninsula. In the coming weeks, they plan to continue collecting trash in lakes and along shorelines in Southwest Iceland.

“Today, divers took it upon themselves to collect trash in Silfra and along its banks,” read a post on the Þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum / Thingvellir National Park Facebook page. “On the surface, the weather was punishing for the trash collectors, but under it, everything was relatively calm. Various items were collected, such as a single snorkel and fin, beer cans, cigarette butts, and coins.”

Ants Stern and Jóna Kolbrún Sigurjónsdóttir, via Thingvellir National Park (FB)

Silfra is a fissure between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates in Þingvellir National Park. There is a diving site, renowned for its crystal-clear water and exceptional visibility, right where the two continents meet, drifting apart about two centimetres (0.8in) per year.