One in Custody for Hamraborg Heist

police station reykjavík

One man is in custody in connection with a robbery that took place near Hamraborg, in Kópavogur, on March 25. RÚV reports that the man is around 40 years old and was arrested on April 30. The two perpetrators of the robbery stole an estimated ISK 10-20 million [$73,000-145,000 / €67,000-134,000] from a cash transport vehicle.

The entire incident transpired in a matter of seconds. In what appears to have been a meticulously planned robbery, the perpetrators swiftly manoeuvred a Toyota Yaris at high speed towards the Öryggismiðstöðin vehicle. Through breaking a window, they managed to snatch two cases filled with money and flee the scene.

One of the cases was subsequently found empty in an open field in Mosfellsbær, with indications that a dye pack had exploded in the bag. As a result, the banknotes from that bag should be blue. As noted by Vísir, the recovered banknotes are in denominations starting from ISK 500.

Yesterday Iceland Review reported on indications that the stolen banknotes had gone into circulation at locations operating gaming machines, among other places.

The arrested man will remain in custody until May 7.

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Blue Banknotes from Kópavogur Robbery Reportedly in Circulation

police lögreglan

There are suspicions that attempts have been made to introduce blue-coloured banknotes into circulation. The banknotes originate from a robbery of a security van, which took place in Kópavogur five weeks ago.

A meticulously planned robbery

In late March, two individuals seized cases from a security vehicle transporting money in Kópavogur in the capital area. Employees of Öryggismiðstöðin, a security firm, were in the process of emptying slot machines at the Catalina restaurant in the Hamraborg area of Kópavogur.

In what appears to have been a meticulously planned robbery, the perpetrators swiftly manoeuvred a Toyota Yaris at high speed towards the Öryggismiðstöðin vehicle. Through breaking a window, they managed to snatch two cases filled with money and flee the scene. The entire incident transpired in a matter of seconds. According to the Reykjavík Metropolitan Police, the amount stolen was estimated at ISK 10-20 million [$73,000-145,000 / €67,000-134,000].

One of the cases was subsequently found empty in an open field in Mosfellsbær, with indications that a dye pack had exploded in the bag. As a result, the banknotes from that bag should be blue. As noted by Vísir, the recovered banknotes are in denominations starting from ISK 500.

Indications that the money is in circulation

Aside from finding one of the cases, the police seemed to have made little headway in their investigation. On April 19, detective Aðalsteinn Örn Aðalsteinsson appealed to the public to notify the police if they observed any of the banknotes from the robbery in circulation: “We are talking about blue-coloured banknotes. We encourage the public to inform the police if they spot such banknotes in circulation,” Aðalsteinn told Vísir on April 19.

According to an article in Vísir today, the police have received indications that some of the blue-coloured banknotes are now in circulation, at locations operating gaming machines, among other places. Aðalsteinn Örn observed that the investigation of the case remained at a very sensitive stage: “The police are not giving any statements at this time. We cannot comment on this matter as the situation stands now,” Aðalsteinn Örn told Vísir.

The Foreman

The crimeIn the small hours of a cold and dark night in 1827, Hjörtur Jónsson’s slumber was interrupted by the distant sound of wood cracking. Wielding a long iron bar, someone was violently prying open the wealthy farmer’s front door; hinges creaked, groaned, and then gave way with a faint bang. Now fully awake, his heart […]

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Two Armed Robberies This Weekend

The police department’s special division arrested a man in Austurvöllur square in downtown Reykjavík around noon on Saturday on suspicion of committing an armed robbery, RÚV reports. The man is suspected of having drawn a knife on employees in a shop on the square. This was among the incidents reported in Saturday’s police blotter.

This is the second armed robbery to have occurred in Reykjavík in just as many days. On Friday afternoon, Vísir reported that the Mexican-style fast-food restaurant Chido in the westside neighbourhood of Vesturbær had also been robbed at knifepoint. In an unexpected twist, the robber made sure to use hand sanitizer before brandishing their weapon. None of the staff were harmed in the robbery, but by the time police arrived, the perpetrator had run off with the contents of the cash register, somewhere in the range of ISK10,000, or a few hundred dollars. The perpetrator had still not been found as of 10:30pm on Friday night.

In addition to the armed robberies, police also stopped a man who is believed to have broken quarantine twice. He had recently arrived in the country but had not yet received the results of his second COVID-19 test. Police also arrested a man who had violated a restraining order, but not until after he’d driven an electric scooter into a police car and briefly evaded capture. There have also been a spate of robberies in 101 and the environs.

Police Track Snowy Footprints, Arrest Thief

Police officers in Akureyri were able to locate and arrest a thief by following his footprints through newly fallen snow, RÚV reports.

The perpetrator threatened two supermarket employees with a knife around 7 am on Sunday morning before making off with a relatively small amount of cash from the register. After arriving on the scene, police followed the man’s footprints to where he was hiding. The man was thought to be under the influence of both alcohol and drugs at the time of his arrest; he did not resist.

The caper was reported on the Akureyri police’s Facebook page, which also noted that all of the store employees had been offered trauma counseling as needed. Police were still considering whether or not the man would be kept in custody and interrogated him, although it was considered unlikely at the time of writing that he had any accomplices.

Runaway Confesses to Bitcoin Robbery

Sindri Þór Stefánsson - bitcoin

Sindri Þór Stefánsson, accused of partaking in the robbery of millions of dollars worth of Bitcoin mining equipment, has confessed to two counts of breaking and entering. RÚV reports that Sindri changed his testimony before the court case began yesterday morning. He says, however, that he did not organise the robbery.

Sindri was being held at low-security prison Sogni earlier this year under suspicion of involvement in the robbery. He escaped the detention centre and fled the country, but eventually turned himself in to police.

Sindri stated that he had originally contacted the individual who organised the robbery because he was hoping to set up a Bitcoin mining centre and was looking for an investor. The individual then suggested the robbery as a way to reduce competition. Sindri stated he believed it was a good idea at the time as he was facing financial difficulties.

Sindri stated he would not reveal the identity of the man behind the robbery, as it could have worse consequences for him and his loved ones. He added that he would return the stolen computers if he knew where they were located. Sindri told the country that the past year has been the most difficult of his life, and that he is no longer the same person he was before being placed in solitary confinement in prison.

Robber Targeted Dacia Dusters

Dacia Duster

A man currently in custody for a number of break-ins targeting Dacia Duster models is suspected of targeting the vehicles because they are common among rental car companies. The thief likely counted on finding valuables in travellers’ luggage, RÚV reports.

Over 100 car break-ins were reported in Reykjavík since October, but none since the man was taken into custody. Police used video surveillance footage to identify the accused.

Police say it is clear the man was not working alone, and collaborators were receiving and purchasing the stolen goods he acquired. The police must decide by tomorrow whether to release the man from custody or extend his warrant.

The suspect has previously stolen goods such as cameras, camera equipment, drones, laptops, jackets and glasses.The case is exceptional: car break-ins are generally uncommon in Iceland.