Árborg Announces Overhaul of Aging Stokkseyri Pool

The public pool in Stokkseyri is in need of repairs

The swimming pool in Stokkseyri, a small town in South Iceland, is in poor condition, requiring extensive repairs to the pool’s basin. According to the Árborg municipality’s website, it is necessary to replace all sides of the pool, as well as the bottom and liner,

Clear that extensive repairs are needed

This summer, as part of the municipality’s austerity measures, Árborg decided to keep the Stokkseyri swimming pool closed this winter, from November until March of next year. In a news update on its website yesterday, Árborg revealed that the pool basin, after 31 years of use, was in a state of disrepair. The municipality also published images depicting the pool’s condition.

Read More: Pooling Together (Iceland’s Unique Swimming Pool Culture)

“It’s clear that more extensive repairs are needed for the Stokkseyri swimming pool’s basin, as all sides of the pool along with the bottom and liner need replacement. Additionally, the hot tubs will be painted, and maintenance of other aspects of the pool’s grounds and building will be considered. Work has begun, but due to the extent of the damage, it’s uncertain when the repairs will be completed,” the municipality’s website notes.

The Stokkseyri swimming pool complex includes an eighteen-metre outdoor pool, a wading pool, and two hot tubs.

The public pool in Stokkseyri
Árborg

Continued Cold Spell: Three Pools in South Iceland Closed

Low cost of electricity in Iceland compared with the rest of Europe

Three public pools in South Iceland will be closed indefinitely today to save hot water, RÚV reports. Iceland’s national utility company does not expect rationing to affect households. Temperatures around the country are expected to drop further this week.

A spell of freezing temperatures

Temperatures in Iceland have barely risen above 0°C over the past days – and the weather is expected to get colder as the week progresses. As noted by RÚV, households in Iceland have been kept warm by an abundance of geothermal energy, and according to information from Veitur – Iceland’s national utility company – the country’s hot-water system is well equipped to handle the cold spell; the system has yet to reach its limit, although Veitur will continue to assess the state of the system on a daily basis.

Even though the country’s hot-water supply is expected to handle the coming cold without incident, Rangárveitur, which manages the hot-water supply in three municipalities in South Iceland, is nearing its limit, a press release from Veitur notes. In light of the cold weather, the local authorities have decided to close three public pools in the area – in Hvolsvöllur, Hella, and Laugaland – starting today. The authorities hope that the pools will only be closed for a few days, or over the coldest period.

Order of priority

As far as additional reductions to the hot-water supply are concerned, a Veitur spokesperson told RÚV that cuts were always made first among large users – bathing lagoons, public pools, and butcheries, e.g. In the event of forced rationing, Veitur screens for “essential services” while also assessing whether relevant water conduits were capable of withstanding closures. As it stands, there is enough hot water to keep Icelandic households warm, although Veitur could be forced to make brief reductions (as in the case of the public pools in the Rangárvellir municipality).

Veitur recommends that homeowners keep their hot-water usage within reasonable limits. Ideally, radiator valves are to be set at 3 (20°C), allowing the thermostatic valve to detect the temperature in the room and adjust accordingly. Windows should be kept closed.