Björk’s Swan Dress Part of Met Museum’s Camp Exhibition

The famous “swan dress” that Björk wore to the 2001 Academy Awards is included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Camp: Notes on Fashion” exhibition, which will open on Thursday, following the New York institution’s annual Met Gala, often referred to as “the Oscars of Fashion.” RÚV reports that the famous frock will be exhibited alongside such iconic garments as the oyster dress that rapper Cardi B wore to the Grammy’s this year, Burberry’s rainbow cloak, and Balenciaga’s platform take on the Crocs clog, among others.

Björk wore the swan dress to the 2001 Academy Awards. That year, her song “I’ve Seen It All” from Lars von Trier’s film “Dancer in the Dark” was nominated for Best Original Song. Björk, who starred in the film, co-wrote the song with Icelandic author Sjón and recorded it with Radiohead singer Thom Yorke.

The swan dress was created by Macedonian fashion designer Marjan Pejoski. At the time, it was widely mocked. Journalist Jay Carr of The Boston Globe memorably remarked, for instance, that the “wraparound swan frock…made her look like a refugee from the more dog-eared precincts of provincial ballet.” It’s stood the test of time, however: Valentino debuted its own version of the dress as part of its Spring 2014 couture collection.

The theme of this year’s Met Gala and the related exhibit takes its inspiration from Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay “Notes on ‘Camp.” The exhibition will be open to the public from May 9 to September 8 in New York City.

 

Björk Debuts Cornucopia in New York City

Björk will be holding eight performances of her latest staged concert, “Cornucopia,” in New York City over the next month. RÚV reports that the Icelandic government has provided ISK 5 million [$41,196; €36,745] for the Hamrahlið Choir to travel to new York City and take part in the series.

Cornucopia will be performed at The Shed, a new arts and theater space in New York City. Per the description on the website, it is a collaboration between Björk and “a team of digital and theatrical collaborators, including award-winning filmmaker, screenwriter, and director Lucrecia Martel.” The performance will include “live musical arrangements, digital technology, and stunning visuals.” Björk has called Cornucopia is her “finest and most complex concert since getting started.”

The first performance will be held on Monday and the final on June 1. Each performance will have an audience of 1,200 people; all performances have sold out. Joining Björk at each of these performances will be a dozens of Icelandic musicians, such as the Vibra Flute Septet, and 50 members of the Hamrahlið Choir. The exact nature of the concert has been kept quite secret: no one from RÚV, for instance, was allowed to take photos during a recent Hamrahlið rehearsal for the upcoming event.