New Minister to Amend Fish Farming Bill

Bjarkey Olsen Gunnarsdóttir, minister of food, agriculture and fisheries

Bjarkey Olsen Gunnarsdóttir, the Left-Green Movement MP who recently became minister of food, agriculture and fisheries, has decided to amend a controversial bill on fish farming, RÚV reports.

The bill has already been submitted to Alþingi, Iceland’s Parliament, and would change the law on aquaculture operations and licenses. The most heavily criticised clause would grant indefinite licenses to fish farming companies. As it stands, the licenses run 16 years with an option to extend.

Public opinion and legal advice

Bjarkey said that she’d received advice from legal counsel that the bill’s aims would best be reached by granting indefinite licenses. “I’m hearing that the public opinion and my legal advice are not in harmony on this issue,” Bjarkey said. “The parliament and I need to take this into account.”

The bill has been criticised by singer Björk and other environmental activists and groups, as well as Kristrún Frostadóttir, the leader of the Social Democratic Alliance. Kristrún compared the bill to the controversial law from the 1990 that handed indefinite fishing quotas to established fisheries. “They’re acting like this is a technical, legal issue to gift these indefinite licenses,” Kristrún said.

Online petition against bill

An online petition has been started, urging MPs to reject the bill. “We the undersigned urge Alþingi to reject the government’s bill on fish farming that would grant indefinite licenses for use of our resource in Icelandic fjords without remuneration,” the petition’s mission statement reads. “The bill authorises polluting industrial production with fish farming in the most sensitive areas of Iceland’s coasts under little supervision and puts the interests of license holders first at the expense of the public interest and nature of the country.”

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Reykjavík to Address Short-Term Rental Market Disruption

iceland refugees

The number of apartments available for short-term rental in Reykjavík has risen sharply in recent years, paralleling the increased flow of foreign tourists into the country. Many such apartments are owned and operated by companies rather than individuals. Due to a regulatory change from 2018, companies do not have to register such units as commercial properties, allowing them to evade higher property taxes and making them harder for municipalities to track. RÚV reported first.

Short-term rentals occupy entire buildings

Kristrún Frostadóttir, chairperson of the Social Democratic Alliance (Samfylkingin), voiced her concerns about the impact of short-term rentals during a question period in Parliament last week. She pointed out that many apartment buildings that had been zoned as residential were largely, or entirely, occupied by short-term rentals. This has a negative impact on the real estate market, according to Kristrún. The MP also pointed out the difficulties municipalities face due to these apartments not being registered as commercial properties.

As noted by RÚV, the regulation was altered during Þórdís Kolbrún Reykfjörð Gylfadóttir’s tenure as Minister of Tourism. Speaking before Parliament yesterday, Þórdís stated that she had considered updating the regulation but stressed the need for municipal responsibility.

“Given the recent media reports, it’s apparent that the situation is not ideal. I urge the honourable member of Parliament to consult with her peers at Reykjavík City Council about managing Airbnb activities in the capital,” Þórdís stated.

Reykjavík seeks regulatory amendment

Reykjavík Mayor Dagur B. Eggertsson described the 2018 regulatory change as problematic. He stated that it made it more difficult to track short-term rentals and enforced regulations, “especially our ban on year-round short-term rentals in residential areas. We advocate for reverting this legislation and maintain that local authorities should oversee this sector, currently managed by the district commissioner,” Dagur told RÚV.

Dagur also mentioned his intention, on behalf of the city, to formally request Tourism Minister Lilja Alfreðsdóttir to amend the regulation. “Addressing such issues, where regulations lead to unintended consequences, is a crucial collaborative effort,” he added.

Opposition Leaders Question Government Mandate

Alþingi parliament of Iceland

In an interview with RÚV yesterday, the leaders of the opposition reacted to Finance Minister Bjarni Benediktsson’s decision to resign. The Chair of the Pirate Party’s Parliamentary Group held that the government’s mandate was “completely compromised” while the Chairs of the Social Democratic Alliance and the Reform Party questioned the coalition’s ability to address the most pressing issues facing Icelanders. The Chair of the People’s Party hoped that Bjarni’s resignation would set a new precedent in Icelandic politics while speculating that Bjarni might switch roles within the government.

“Completely compromised”

Following the resignation of Finance Minister Bjarni Benediktsson yesterday, RÚV solicited reactions from leaders of the opposition parties. The Party Group Chair of the Pirate Party stated that the mandate of the government was completely compromised.

“It’s important to note that the mandate of this government is completely compromised, especially since the Prime Minister and other leaders within the government have fully supported the Finance Minister’s governance up to this point,” Þórhildur Sunna Ævarsdóttir, the parliamentary group leader of the Pirate Party, told RÚV yesterday.

“They should, therefore, see every reason to seriously reconsider their position in light of the ombudsman’s conclusion. And this, of course, applies to Bjarni as well.”

An unexpected decision – but the right one

Kristrún Frostadóttir, Chair of the Social Democratic Alliance, admitted that the resignation had been unexpected: “In some ways, this is an unexpected decision, but it’s the right one. He is taking responsibility, and I agree with him to the extent that as a minister, he could no longer fulfil his duties.”

Kristrún also contemplated the future of the government: “I believe the entire government needs to address whether it can truly handle the tasks at hand that matter most to the people. I’m thinking about economic issues and major welfare matters.”

Government mandate weakened

Þorgerður Katrín Gunnarsdóttir, Chair of the Reform Party, echoed Kristrún’s sentiments.

“It’s clear that when the leader of the largest party in the government steps down from a crucial ministry like the Ministry of Finance, it weakens the government. We repeatedly see this government expend their energy on internal disputes rather than focusing on what matters most to households and businesses in the country, namely inflation and the battle against interest rates.

A precedent is set

Inga Sæland, Chair of the People’s Party, told RÚV that Bjarni’s resignation had marked a turning point in Icelandic politics, as he had taken political responsibility, hopefully setting a precedent for the future: “We’re not used to seeing a minister step down like this without being pressured out of office with significant hullabaloo.”

However, Inga speculated that Bjarni might not be leaving politics altogether. “I wouldn’t be surprised if he switches to another ministry. There are only two possibilities: he either moves to another ministry or resigns from parliament, and I’m not sure if that’s good for his party as a whole.”

Nonetheless, Inga believes that Bjarni’s resignation did not mark a turning point for the coalition government. “It will try to endure despite everything.”