Family Requests Body of Mountaineer John Snorri Be Buried with Companions

John Snorri Sigurjónsson icelandic mountaineer

In a recent public announcement on Facebook, Lína Móey, wife of the Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri Sigurjónsson, expressed her wishes for the burial of her husband.

John Snorri was a respected mountaineer and the first Icelander to summit several major peaks, including Lhotse and K2. He and his climbing companions Ali Sadpara and Juan Pablo Mohr went missing in February of last year and were officially presumed dead. Their bodies were found in July on the slopes above Camp 4.

In her statement, Lína Móey clarified that the death of John Snorri had “turned their world upside down.” She and her family needed some time to come to a decision that would be both be good for them, but also consider the safety of those offering to help them.

As there are currently several teams attempting a K2 summit, it is unclear which team will come across John Snorri’s remains first. Lína Móey stated that her first choice is that John Snorri’s body be moved to his climbing companions and given a suitable burial. If this is not possible, then she desires him to be moved off the trail and placed out of sight. In her statement, she also requested that no photographs or videos be taken of his body without permission.

Lína Móey will be travelling to Pakistan at the end of July and staying there for some two weeks to finalize her affairs.

In her statement, she thanked all who had helped her family so far and expressed both her gratitude and concern for the safety of all.

Read our profile on John Snorri here.

Closer to the Stars

john snorri icelandic mountaineer

The Savage Mountain When John Snorri Sigurjónsson was 14 years old, he flipped open a magazine and fell in love with a mountain. “From that point onward,” he would later remark, “there was only one mountain in my eyes.” He may have been referring to an article from 1987, which ran under the heading “Suicide […]

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John Snorri and Companions Likely Reached K2 Summit

John Snorri við Stein á Esjunni

Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri Sigurjónsson and his two companions likely reached the summit of K2 before perishing in a storm on the way down. The trio set out to summit the mountain, the world’s second-highest after Everest, last winter but lost contact with base camp on February 5, 2021. Search and rescue efforts in the following days were unsuccessful and their bodies were only found on the mountain earlier this week.

A tweet from “Team Ali Sadpara,” the Twitter account previously belonging to John Snorri’s climbing companion of the same name, revealed that Ali’s son Sajid and other climbers were transporting the three bodies further down the mountain to where they would hopefully be retrieved by helicopter at a later date. “At the moment, immediate retrieval efforts can harm the bodies as well as pose great risks to people involved,” the Tweet stated.

The team states that “as per instruments and presence of fig8 it is now confirmed that climbers had summited K2 in winters [sic] and were frozen to death due to storm on their way back.”

A memorial plaque for John Snorri has been placed at the mountain’s Gilkey Memorial. In a statement sent to media, his widow Lína Móey wrote: “John’s family wants to thank you for the warmth, support, and care that we have been shown over the past months and we would like to reiterate our sincere thanks to everyone who has taken part in the search for John Snorri, Ali, and J Pablo.”

Two Bodies Found on K2: One May Be John Snorri

John Snorri Sigurjónsson icelandic mountaineer

Update July 26, 2:49 PM: A third body has been found on K2 and it is thus exceedingly likely the two unidentified bodies belong to John Snorri Sigurjónsson and Juan Pablo Mohr.

The remains of two climbers have been found on K2, ExplorersWeb reports. One of the bodies has been identified as Ali Sadpara, and the other is believed to be his expedition companion, Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri Sigurjónsson. The two were last heard from on February 5 some 400 metres from the top of the mountain, which is Earth’s second-highest after Mt. Everest. Search and rescue teams were unsuccessful in finding the men.

A Sherpa team found the remains of two climbers on the mountain earlier today. One was identified as Pakistani climber Ali Sadpara while the other was face down and covered in ice, making it difficult to identify. The body was dressed in a yellow and black suit: both John Snorri and Chilean Juan Pablo Mohr were wearing those colours when they were last seen heading up the mountain. However, an ExplorersWeb source stated that the Sherpa team believed the body was John Snorri’s.

At 8,611m [28,251ft], K2 is the second-highest mountain on Earth and is considered a much more challenging climb than Mt. Everest. In 2017, John Snorri became the first Icelander to top the mountain, which is located on the China-Pakistan border. He then set his sights on being the first person ever to ascend the peak during winter but was beaten to that goal by a team of Nepalese mountaineers in January 2021.

Last February, John Snorri was making his second attempt to ascend K2 in winter when he and his expedition lost contact with base camp. There has been speculation that John Snorri and Ali did in fact reach the summit of K2 after they lost contact on February 5 and landed in trouble on their way back down the mountain.

John Snorri, Ali Sadpara, And Juan Pablo Mohr Presumed Dead

John Snorri við Stein á Esjunni

Pakistan authorities have officially declared that Iceland’s John Snorri Sigurjónsson, Pakistan’s Ali Sadpara and Chile’s Juan Pablo Mohr are presumed dead, RÚV reports. John Snorri’s family believe they reached K2’s peak but encountered issues on the way down. They were last heard from February 5 at the most challenging part of the route to the K2 summit. Search for their bodies will continue.

At a press conference earlier today, Gilgit-Baltistan’s Minister of Tourism Raja Nasir Ali Khan declared that the three missing climbers were presumed dead. This was the conclusion of meteorologists, other climbers, and the Pakistani army’s specialist. John Snorri and his companions last made contact on February 5. There was no way to survive for this long under such challenging weather conditions. Khan stated that search for their bodies would continue.

Originally, John Snorri intended to climb the mountain with father and son Ali and Sajid Sadpara. Juan Pablo Mohr joined them high in the mountain but Sajid had to turn back due to an oxygen malfunction in the so-called bottleneck region at an altitude of around 8,200 m (26,900 ft) above sea level. K2’s peak is at an altitude of 8,611m (28,251 ft). In a statement posted to Facebook, on behalf of their family, John Snorri’s wife, Lína Móey Bjarnadóttir thanked everyone who helped look for John Snorri and his companions. They state that based on the timing of their last known whereabouts, they firmly believe that the three reached the peak, but that something went wrong on their way down. Both Sajid and Raja Nasir Ali Khan have made similar statements about the climbers reaching the peak. John Snorri’s family expresses their gratitude to Pakistan, Chile, and Iceland’s authorities, as well as their gratitude that Sajid survived.

John Snorri’s family’s statement reads: “Our Icelandic hearts are beating with Pakistani and Chilean hearts. Thank you to all who have devoted your time to the search and taken the time to care by sending supportive words and thoughts to us in these difficult times.  Ali, John and Juan Pablo will live forever in our hearts.”

Hope Dwindles for Mountaineer John Snorri’s Safe Return

John Snorri Sigurjónsson icelandic mountaineer

Icelandic mountain climber John Snorri Sigurjónsson remains missing after attempting to summit K2, the world’s second-highest mountain, last week. Rescue crews and climbers have stated it is unlikely that John Snorri and his two companions are still alive as conditions on the mountain are extremely cold and difficult. John Snorri’s wife Lína Móey Bjarnadóttir stated she still hopes for a miracle and her husband’s safe return.

John Snorri is accompanied by Pakistani mountaineer Ali Sadpara as well as Chilean climber Juan Pablo Mohr. The three lost contact with base camp last Friday when they were some 400 metres from the peak. Ali’s son Sajid Sadpara, who accompanied the team up to 8,200 metres before turning back due to a malfunction in his oxygen tank, has participated in the search for the team, which has involved several helicopter trips and assistance from the Pakistani Army. Sadpara has stated it is unlikely his father and the others are still alive.

John Snorri’s Wife Holds Out Hope

In a post on her Facebook page yesterday, John Snorri’s wife Lína Móey Bjarnadóttir stated she still has hope that her husband will return home safely. “I have not given up and know that there is still room for a miracle because the week is not over, his camp will stay open until Saturday. Those who know John Snorri Sigurðsson know what strength he has and I hope that more people out there will give me the wind beneath my wings to try until we’ve tried everything.”

At 8,611m (28,251ft), K2 is the second-highest mountain on Earth and is considered a much more challenging climb than Mt. Everest, the world’s highest peak. In 2017, John Snorri became the first Icelander to top the mountain, which is located on the China-Pakistan border. He then set his sights on being the first person ever to ascend the peak during winter but was beaten to that goal by a team of Nepalese mountaineers last month. This is John Snorri’s second attempt to ascend K2 in winter.

The search for the team continues, though according to a press release weather conditions have made it “almost impossible.”

No Traces of Icelandic Mountaineer on K2

K2 John Snorri

Several helicopter missions have failed to find any traces of Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri and his team, who have not been heard from for over three days after setting out to reach the summit of K2, the second-highest mountain in the world. Sherpa Chhang Dawa, who took part in the search, stated that teams flew over an altitude of 7,000m (23,000ft) but found no clues as to what has happened to the missing climbers.

At 8,611m (28,251ft), K2 is the second-highest mountain on Earth and is considered a much more challenging climb than Mt. Everest, the world’s highest peak. In 2017, John Snorri became the first Icelander to top K2, which is located on the China-Pakistan border. He then set his sights on being the first person ever to ascend the peak during winter but was beaten to that goal by Nepalese mountaineer Mingma Gyalje last month. This is John Snorri’s second attempt to ascend K2 in winter.

John Snorri is accompanied by Pakistani mountaineer Ali Sadpara as well as Chilean climber Juan Pablo Mohr. The three lost contact with base camp late last Friday when they were some 400 metres from the peak. The search for the team began on Saturday. Ali’s son Sajid Sadpara, who accompanied the team up to 8,200 metres, stated he believes the team reached the peak and likely had an accident on the way back down.

John Snorri Makes Second Attempt At a Winter Ascent of K2

“Finally, this day has come,” mountaineer John Snorri Sigurjónsson posted on Facebook yesterday. He was on his way to Islamabad, about to embark on his second attempt to climb K2 in Pakistan during winter. If he succeeds, he will be the first person to climb the mountain in winter.

In his post, John Snorri stated that he got his permit August 17 and that his gear is already at K2 base camp. He organised the journey with a group of people, including a father-and-son team of high-altitude porters, Muhammad Ali Sadpara and his son Sajid Ali. The team also includes a liaison officer, a chef, weather forecaster and a tour operator who handles logistics.


John Snorri made his first attempt last winter but was forced to cancel when two members of his team expressed that they did not feel fully prepared for the expedition. K2 is the second-highest mountain on earth at 8,611m (28,251 ft) and is considered a much more challenging climb than mt. Everest. John Snorri first reached the peak of K2 in the summer of 2017, but no one has reached the peak in winter. The first successful expedition was in 1954, but only 367 people have ascended the mountain since then, and attempts at winter expedition have all been unsuccessful. Over 80 people have died attempting to reach the peak of K2.

John Snorri Cancels K2 Climb

Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri Sigurjónsson has cancelled his planned climb of K2, the world’s second-highest mountain. John was hoping to be the first person ever to climb the mountain during winter. The decision to cancel the ascent was made after two members of John’s team expressed they did not feel fully prepared for the expedition.

“Summiting K2 in winter is a formidable task that necessitates all team members being fully prepared, both mentally and physically, to face the challenge,” John Snorri wrote in a Facebook post yesterday announcing the decision. “Team members Mingma G of Nepal and Ga Li of China have both expressed that they don’t feel fully prepared to make the scheduled attempt of personal reason [sic]. Taking this into consideration and after much deliberation, it has been decided that the mission will not go forward.”

Ice as hard as safety glass

In an interview with mbl.is, John’s wife Lína Móey Björnsdóttir stated that John had been ready to go ahead with the expedition, despite two members of the team dropping out. The decision to cancel the trip was made when the five other team members did not trust themselves to continue under the changed circumstances.

“There have to be more of them,” Lína explained. “The ice on the mountain, as he described it to me, is like safety glass. You have to kick it four to five times with crampons and the ice axe to get a grip. They would quickly get very tired and would have to always be taking turns and doing it together. They could have never done it just three.”

Lína said John Snorri was already on his way to Islamabad, the Pakistani capital, and would be home in Iceland after the weekend. “It was a big disappointment for him to have to cancel the trip,” she stated.

John Snorri’s K2 Winter Expedition Continues: “I Feel Good”

Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri Sigurjónsson is currently hoping to become the first person in history to ascend K2 during winter. “One understands why no one has been able to summit the mountain in wintertime,” John Snorri revealed in a conversation with Iceland Review yesterday.

The World’s Most Dangerous Mountain

Situated on the border of China and Pakistan, K2 is the world’s second-highest mountain standing at 8,611 meters. Besides being considered the most dangerous mountain in the world (for every four people who reach the summit, one person, on average, dies), K2 is also the only 8,000-metre peak that has never been summited during winter. Icelandic mountaineer John Snorri, alongside his team, aims to be the first to conquer K2 in winter.

Slow Going

Departing from Iceland on January 3, John Snorri reached K2 base camp on January 22, along with fellow climbers Mingma G. from Nepal, Gao Li from China, and Tomaz Rotar from Slovenia. Other supporting climbers will include Tamting Sherpa of Nepal, Phur Galjenn of Nepal, Passang Namke Sherpa of Nepal, and Sirbaz Khan of Pakistan.

As reported on Apricot Tours, it took John Snorri’s team three days to travel from Concordia, the confluence of the mighty Baltoro Glacier and the Godwin-Austen Glacier, to K2 base camp owing to bad snow conditions – a trek that normally takes seven hours. As John Snorri wrote last week on Instagram:

“The whole team has finally reached K2 base camp after [nine] days on the Baltoro glacier. We have been establishing our camp in -27°C. Tomorrow is a resting day. [W] are all tired after tough days. Friday we will start our first rotation. Up to ABC through the icefall. We need to set a safe rout[e] up.”

Unforgiving Conditions

In an online conversation with Iceland Review yesterday, John Snorri revealed that conditions on the mountain were unforgiving:

“We’re at base camp. We fixed ropes to Camp 1 yesterday. This weekend’s forecast is good, and so we plan on sleeping at Camp 1 and fixing ropes to Camp 2. The mountain is covered in ice, and there is little respite to be found. The temperature is 20 to 35 degrees below zero, and, more often than not, quite windy. I feel good. The sherpas have been complaining a little as they aren’t used to the cold; the winters in Nepal are warmer than the winters in Pakistan. It’s a difficult climb; one understands why no one has been able to summit in winter before.”

Readers can follow John Snorri’s journey on Instagram.