Halla Tómasdóttir Gains Steam

Halla Tómasdóttir, candidate for president of Iceland

Halla Hrund Logadóttir and Katrín Jakobsdóttir are neck and neck in the race for president of Iceland, according to the latest poll by Gallup. Halla Tómasdóttir, who had been polling below 5% jumps to 11%, RÚV reports.

Baldur in third place

The polling followed a televised debate on 3 May. Halla Hrund, the Director General of Iceland’s National Energy Authority drops in the poll from 36% down to 25% as Katrín, the former prime minister and chairperson of the Left-Green Movement, rises from 23% to 25%.

Baldur Þórhallsson, a professor of political science at the University of Iceland, is firmly in third place with 18%, while Halla Tómasdóttir, a businessperson and former candidate, eclipses Jón Gnarr, a comedian and former mayor of Reykjavík, who is polling at 10%. Other candidates are polling at lower numbers, but Arnar Þór Jónsson, a lawyer and former judge, has reached 6%.

Difference by age and gender

When the polling is broken down by age, gender, education and political views, it becomes clear that Halla Hrund is popular among men, while Baldur is popular among women. Older people are more likely to support Katrín or Halla Hrund, while younger people favour Baldur and Jón.

The election will take place in one round on 1 June.

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Halla Hrund Leads Polls in Presidential Race

Halla Hrund Logadóttir is enjoying a significant lead in Iceland’s ongoing presidential race, with nearly 30% support among voters. Former Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir is in second place with just over 21% and Baldur Þórhallsson in third with just over 20%, though the difference is not considered statistically significant. Former Reykjavík Mayor Jón Gnarr takes fourth place with just under 15%.

Katrín’s support growing

The data is from the most recent weekly poll conducted by Prósent for Morgunblaðið. Halla Hrund showed similar support as in the previous week, whereas Katrín Jakobsdóttir showed increased support after dropping in the polls last week. In an unprecedented move, Katrín resigned as Prime Minister last month in order to run for the post.

Record number of candidates

Morgunblaðið notes that most of the responses were submitted before the televised debate that took place last Friday evening, which may impact current support. Respondents were also asked who they believed was most likely to win the election. Respondents considered Halla Hrund and Katrín to be the most likely winners, with neither favoured over the other in the data.

Iceland’s presidential election will take place on June 1. There are 11 official candidates running, a historic record. Current president Guðni Th. Jóhannesson is not running for reelection.

Katrín and Halla Hrund Level-Pegging in Latest Survey

Katrín and Halla Hrund level-pegging in recent survey.

In a recent survey conducted by the School of Social Sciences at the University of Iceland, Katrín Jakobsdóttir leads with 29.9% of the votes, closely followed by Halla Hrund Logadóttir at 27.6%. Jón Gnarr, whose support was measured at 15-20% in previous polls, is polling at 7.4% according to this new survey.

Katrín, Halla Hrund polling strongly

Katrín Jakobsdóttir leads with 29.9% of the votes in a new poll conducted by the School of Social Sciences at the University of Iceland between April 22 to April 30. Halla Hrund Logadóttir follows closely with 27.6%. However, no statistically significant difference is measured between the two candidates.

This is the first poll released since the candidates were confirmed, although it was partly conducted before their confirmation.

The results mark a noticeable shift from recent surveys by Maskína and Prósent, where support for Katrín had significantly declined: from roughly 31% in the Gallup poll published about two weeks ago to 18% in the Prósent poll. In the University poll, Baldur Þórhallsson’s support sits at 23.6%, which is significantly lower than Halla Hrund, but similar to his ratings in the last two polls.

Jón Gnarr suffers a dip

As noted by RÚV, the key revelation of the survey may revolve around Jón Gnarr, who has been polling at between 15-20% in surveys over the past month. This time, however, his support measures only 7.4%, marking a stark decrease of more than half compared to previous polls.

Other candidates are all polling below 5%: Halla Tómasdóttir would receive 4.5% of the votes if the elections were held now, and Arnar Þór Jónsson would receive 4.1%. Other candidates are polling with or within 1% support, according to the survey.

The poll was conducted before it was clear that Viktor Traustason would be a presidential candidate. The National Electoral Commission initially declared his candidacy invalid, but after the Election Complaints Committee invalidated that decision, the National Electoral Commission deemed his candidacy valid.

Baldur most popular among young voters

Katrín and Baldur enjoy the most support among female voters, with about 30% of them inclined to vote for either of them individually. Men would mostly vote for Katrín and Halla Hrund, with each garnering the support of 30% of male voters according to the survey.

Katrín garners significant support among the oldest voters, with Halla following closely behind. Baldur enjoys the most support among the youngest voters.

Record Number of Presidential Candidates in Iceland

Bessastaðir, official residence of the President of Iceland.

There are 11 official candidates in Iceland’s Presidential election this June 1. The National Electoral Commission has reviewed the documents of all 13 candidates who submitted their endorsements last Friday, ruling two applications as invalid, RÚV reports. The number of official candidates is a record for the country, and includes Katrín Jakobsdóttir, who resigned as Prime Minister in order to run.

Submitted only nine endorsements

Candidates hoping to run in a presidential election in Iceland must collect and submit a minimum of 1,500 endorsements (signatures of support) from all four quadrants of the country. One of the two candidates whose application was deemed invalid had submitted only nine signatures of endorsement. The other was several hundred endorsements short of the minimum.

Read More: How do I become President of Iceland?

Between Iceland’s first presidential election in 1952 until the 2004 election, there were never more than four candidates running for the position, and on two occasions there were just two candidates. Since 2004, the number of candidates in presidential elections has grown. In 2012 there were six official candidates and in 2016 there were nine. In Iceland’s last presidential election, in 2020, there were only two.

The presidential candidates are listed below in alphabetical order:

  • Arnar Þór Jónsson
  • Ásdís Rán Gunnarsdóttir
  • Ástþór Magnússon Wium
  • Baldur Þórhallsson
  • Eiríkur Ingi Jóhannsson
  • Halla Hrund Logadóttir
  • Halla Tómasdóttir
  • Helga Þórisdóttir
  • Jón Gnarr
  • Katrín Jakobsdóttir
  • Steinunn Ólína Þorsteinsdóttir

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New Presidential Challenger, Poll Suggests

Halla Hrund Logadóttir, director general of Iceland’s National Energy Authority and adjunct lecturer in public policy at Harvard university, would receive 26.2% of the vote in the presidential election, according to a new poll by Maskína.

However, the difference between her and two other candidates polling at the top is not statistically significant, RÚV reports.

Four candidates in double digits

Katrín Jakobsdóttir, former prime minister and leader of the Left-Green Movement, is polling at 25.4% and Baldur Þórhallsson, professor of political science, comes in with 21.2% support. Katrín and Baldur have been leading the polls in recent weeks.

Four candidates are polling in double digits, with comedian and former mayor Jón Gnarr polling at 15.2%. Other candidates are polling at under 5%.

Election in just over a month

The presidential election will take place in one round on June 1. Current president Guðni Th. Jóhannesson announced in an address on January 1 that he would not seek re-election after serving two terms. The office of president is mostly ceremonial, but does come with limited political powers.

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Presidential Candidates Katrín and Baldur Neck and Neck

Bessastaðir, official residence of the President of Iceland.

The field of candidates for the office of president of Iceland is becoming clearer, with elections set for June 1. The frontrunners are neck and neck, according to pollster Gallup, with former Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir polling at 30% and Baldur Þórhallsson, professor of political science, at 26%.

Vísir reports that this survey shows that Katrín and Baldur are statistically equal. Comedian and former mayor of Reykjavík Jón Gnarr is in third place with 18%, the only other candidate in double digits.

Political turmoil after Katrín’s announcement

The race was shaken up by Katrín’s announcement that she would resign as prime minister and leader of the Left-Green Movement to run for president, a mostly ceremonial position that comes with limited political powers. Independence Party leader Bjarni Benediktsson took over as prime minister as other cabinet positions were reshuffled. Katrín remains a popular politician, even though her coalition government has lost public support during this term.

Other candidates are polling at lower numbers. Halla Tómasdóttir, CEO of B Team, polls at 7%, with lawyer Arnar Þór Jónsson and Halla Hrund Logadóttir, director general of Iceland’s National Energy Authority both at 4%.

Age and gender divide

According to Gallup, older people are more likely to vote for Katrín, while Jón gets most of his support from younger people. Women are also more likely to support Baldur, Halla Tómasdóttir and Katrín, with men more likely to support Jón.

The deadline to confirm candidacy is in two weeks and the election takes place on June 1. The current president, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, announced on January 1 that he would not run again after serving two terms.

Katrín Leads in Presidential Poll

Katrín Jakobsdóttir Bjarni Benediktsson Sigurður Ingi Ráðherra

Katrín Jakobsdóttir, who resigned as prime minister and leader of the Left-Green Movement this weekend to run for president of Iceland, leads the race according to a new survey by pollster Maskína.

32.9% said they would vote for Katrín in the presidential election scheduled for June 1, Mbl.is reports. Katrín announced her campaign last week after months of speculation, throwing the future of the coalition government she headed into question. Discussions are ongoing within her party and coalition partners the Independence Party and the Progressive Party about the shape of a new cabinet to serve until next year’s parliamentary elections. Katrín remains as prime minister until a new coalition is formed.

Baldur close on Katrín’s heels

26.7% said they would vote for Baldur Þórhallsson, professor of political science. Jón Gnarr, comedian and former mayor of Reykjavík, had 19.6% support in the poll. 7.9% said they would vote for Halla Tómasdóttir, CEO of B Team. Halla Hrund Logadóttir, director general of the National Energy Authority, had 5.7% support, while other candidates polled below 5%.

The current president, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, announced on January 1 that he would not be seeking reelection after two terms in office. The role of president is a largely ceremonial one, although it comes with limited political powers.

Coalition Government in Flux After PM Decision

government coalition

The future of the coalition government is uncertain following yesterday’s announcement by Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir that she would leave her post to run for the office of president.

Katrín’s Left-Green Movement, the Independence Party and the Progressive Party make up the coalition, but it is unclear if it will continue until the elections set for next year. It has not been announced who will take over from Katrín as prime minister or if new elections will be called ahead of schedule.

Unclear who will be prime minister

According to Morgunblaðið, the leaders of the coalition parties are in talks about the next steps, with both the Independence Party and the Progressive Party laying claim to the office of prime minister. If talks break down, a new coalition could be formed to serve until next year’s elections.

Opposition MPs have called for a new election immediately. The Left-Green Movement will also need to choose a successor for Katrín, who resigned as leader yesterday after 11 years at the helm. Guðmundur Ingi Guðbrandsson, minister of social affairs and the labour market, has taken Katrín’s place until party members make their decision.

Dozens of candidates for president

Katrín is leaving parliamentary politics to campaign for the largely ceremonial office of president. This is the first time in Iceland’s history that the reigning prime minister runs for president. Current president, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, announced on January 1 that he would leave the office this summer after having served two terms.

Other candidates for president include Jón Gnarr, comedian and former mayor of Reykjavík, Halla Tómasdóttir, CEO of B Team, Baldur Þórhallsson, professor of political science, and dozens of others. The election takes place in one round on June 1. Therefore, the next president could be elected with a significant minority of the total vote.

“Not a Job, a Lifestyle” – Jón Gnarr Runs for President

Former mayor and comedian Jón Gnarr runs for president

Jón Gnarr, former Reykjavík mayor and comedian, has announced his candidacy for the Icelandic presidency. He promises to maintain a positive relationship with the government, aiming to improve Iceland’s well-being and international reputation, with enough endorsements already secured to officially run for president.

Not a job, a lifestyle

Former mayor of Reykjavík and comedian Jón Gnarr announced his candidacy for the presidency of Iceland in a video on social media last night. In the video, Jón noted that since the New Year – when President Guðni Th. Jóhannesson announced that he would be stepping down – he had been encouraged to run by “many people.” The same had been true in 2016, although he had not considered it timely back then.

Read More: How Do I Become President of Iceland

Jón characterised the presidency as “not a typical job but a lifestyle.” A president needs to understand the Icelandic national psyche and be able to unite the nation. “Being president is not a regular job but rather a lifestyle that dominates every moment and every day throughout the year. I am quite familiar with this after having been the mayor of Reykjavik during a difficult time in the city’s history.”

Promises a good relationship with the government

Jón also noted that peace and human rights have served as something of a calling in his life. “As mayor, I supported and drew attention to human rights and peace efforts and intend to continue doing so if I am elected president.”

Jón added that he had great respect for Iceland’s parliament and plans to have a good relationship with the government at any given time. “My heart will always be with the people of the country, and my actions will show that.”

As president, he intends to work on the well-being of Iceland and strive to enhance the country’s reputation and respect. “I will be the representative of the nation domestically and its ambassador abroad.”

As noted by RÚV, Heiða Kristín Helgadóttir, who is part of Jón’s campaign team, confirmed that Jón had gathered enough endorsements to run for president. The collection of endorsements began at 8 PM last night when Jón announced his candidacy. About one and a half hours later, he had collected the minimum number of endorsements in each of the country’s voting quarters.

Iceland President Cancels Ukraine Trip

President of Iceland Guðni Th. Jóhannesson.

President of Iceland Guðni Th. Jóhannesson cancelled a visit to Ukraine over safety concerns. The trip was scheduled for Easter Sunday, Mbl.is reports.

Security concerns

Among the events scheduled for President Guðni’s visit were a meeting with Volodymyr Zelenskyy, president of Ukraine, followed by a ceremony for the two year anniversary of the Bucha massacre when Russian troops invaded the city. The president was to attend a conference following the ceremony.

Due to security concerns, the Ukrainian government cancelled the event. In the last few days, Russian troops have increased the number of missile and drone strikes, affecting energy infrastructure.

Presidential election coming up

President Guðni is enjoying his last few months in office, with a presidential election set for June 1. In his New Year’s Day address on January 1, he announced that he would not run again after two terms in office, totalling eight years.

Among the candidates are Baldur Þórhallsson, professor of political science, and Halla Tómasdóttir, CEO of B Team, while comedian Jón Gnarr is expected to announce today whether or not he will run. Among other rumoured candidates is Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir.