Mumps Diagnosed in Reykjavík Area

doctor nurse hospital health

A case of mumps was diagnosed in Iceland’s capital area in early February. Now, a second person connected to the first case has also been diagnosed with the illness. Mumps is a viral respiratory infection that has been quite rare in Iceland since 1989, though a few outbreaks have occurred since then.

Those who were exposed to the positive mumps cases have been informed by health authorities, according to a notice from the Directorate of Health. Those who were exposed and are unvaccinated were advised to stay away from others to reduce the risk of infection. The gestation period for mumps is about three weeks, so it is possible that other cases will emerge in Iceland.

Vaccination is the most effective protection against mumps and has been routine in Iceland since 1989. Since 2000, a few outbreaks have occurred, mainly in people born between 1985-1987. Older cohorts are generally considered immune due to frequent outbreaks prior to 1984.

Rates of measles rising in Europe

A case of measles was diagnosed in Iceland recently as well, in an adult traveller who had recently arrived from abroad. Chief Epidemiologist Guðrún Aspelund stated that measles infections are on the rise in Europe, which increases the likelihood of an outbreak in Iceland.

First Measles Case in Iceland in Five Years

Landspítali national hospital

An adult traveller visiting Iceland was diagnosed with measles on February 2, Iceland’s first case of the highly infection illness in five years. The man is in isolation at the National Hospital and all those at risk of exposure to the illness have been contacted by authorities.

A serious illness

Measles are a highly infectious, serious illness, characterised by red flecks that spread across the skin. The death rate of measles infection is 1-3 per 1,000 cases. Once infected, it usually takes 10-12 days for symptoms to appear.

While those who have been vaccinated against measles are very unlikely to get infected, participation in measles vaccination in Iceland has been falling in recent years. According to the newest review by the Directorate of Health, participation has dropped from around 93-95% down to around 90%, which is too low to maintain herd immunity.

“We would really like to see higher [participation] in order to better prevent the spread of infection through society, but participation needs to be quite good to ensure that,” Chief Epidemiologist Guðrún Aspelund told RÚV. She added that measles infections are on the rise in Europe, which increases the likelihood of an outbreak in Iceland.

Eradicated in the 90s in Iceland

Measles were eradicated in Iceland in the 1990s, and were not diagnosed again until 2014. Since that date, all measles cases diagnosed in Iceland have originated abroad. “It’s not circulating here in Iceland and we want to prevent it from spreading and leading to group outbreaks or more cases here,” Guðrún stated.

Children in Iceland typically receive two measles vaccinations, which Guðrún says provide protection for life.

Never More Strain on Hospital, Chief Physician Says

Emergency room

New rules took effect today at Iceland’s National University Hospital of Iceland due to increased strain and an outbreak of respiratory infections. Mask use is once again mandatory for outpatients and visitors, and visiting hours have been reduced. Chief Physician of the Infectious Diseases Ward Már Kristjánsson told RÚV it is “the most strain that we have ever seen the hospital under.”

Mandatory mask use

Mask use is mandatory in all interactions with patients as of today, January 4. Inpatients are not required to wear masks, but outpatients and their chaperones are required to do so. Visitors and others entering the hospital are also required to wear surgical masks. In departments where COVID-19 outbreaks occur, staff are required to wear fine particle (FFP2) masks.

Visiting hours have been shortened and will be between 4:30 and 7:30 PM on weekdays and 2:30-7:30 PM on weekends. The hospital recommends guests come one at a time and wash their hands upon entering the hospital.

Exceptions may be granted

Sibling visits to the children’s hospital are only permitted in consultation with the children’s ward staff. Exceptions to all of the new infection prevention regulations can be granted by department or shift managers.

Read more about the National Hospital’s persistent problem of patient flow.