Travel Ban to Mýrdalsjökull Lifted

Katla volcano

After a meeting with Iceland’s Meteorological Office, authorities in South Iceland have lifted the travel ban which was in place following increased seismic activity from Katla.

Significant earthquakes were recorded under Mýrdalsjökull this Sunday, October 16. The largest of the recent quakes was measured at 3.8M. Because of this increased activity, Katla, one of Iceland’s most dangerous volcano systems, was placed under special monitoring and trips to the region were temporarily suspended.

Notably, this affected many ice cave tourist trips.

Read more: Increasing Seismic Activity under Mýrdalsjökull

Increased seismic activity meant both an increased chance of glacial flooding and also potential exposure to volcanic gases. Now, however, authorities believe the disturbance have passed and trips to the area can resume.

The authorities recommend that tourism operators carry with them gas meters and be ready to leave the area if conditions change.

Grímsvötn Flooding Reaches its Peak, Begins to Recede

grímsvön flooding

The flow of the Grímsvötn glacial flooding reached its peak yesterday morning and has begun to subside. 

The flooding is caused by melting glacial ice from the volcano Grímsvötn, which rests underneath one of Vatnajökull’s ice caps. Glacial flooding from this volcano system is a regular event on Iceland’s south coast, and the most recent round of floods has not caused any significant damage to infrastructure.

Since last night, several earthquakes have been registered at Grímsvötn, but the Meteorological Office reports that there is no significant increase in seismic activity or threat of eruption.

In total, the ice sheet has sunk some 15m, indicating the volume displaced by the flooding. At its peak, the flow from the glacier reached 500m³/s, a level that is not considered to pose any significant risk to the region. Travellers to the south coast may, however, have noticed swollen rivers over the weekend.

Grímsvötn is one of Iceland’s most active volcano systems, with eruption cycles average 5-10 years. With Grímsvötn’s last eruption having taken place in 2011, it may be soon due, but as of now, there are no immediate signs pointing towards and eruption.

Level of Uncertainty Declared over Glacial Flooding from Grímsvötn

Vatnajökull Grímsfjall Grímsvötn Bárðarbunga Kverkfjöll Jöklar Jökull Vísindi

Civil Defense authorities have announced a State of Uncertainty due to glacial flooding from Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under Vatnajökull.

The ice sheet has been measured as receding in the last few days, accompanied by increased seismic activity.

Grímsvötn, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes, has an eruption cycle of 5-10 years. As its last eruption was in 2011, it could mean that it is due soon. Glacial flooding can also trigger subglacial eruptions, which has been known to happen at Grímsvötn.

The glacial flooding is expected to last for several days, but no structural damage is expected. Grímsvötn flooding has become more frequent in recent years, meaning that individual floods are milder and cause less damage to infrastructure.

Read more about Grímsvötn and the flooding at Iceland’s Meteorological Office.