Hildur Wins Grammy for Chernobyl

Hildur Guðnadóttir grammy award

Icelandic composer Hildur Guðnadóttir continued her winning streak last night in Los Angeles, taking home a Grammy award in the category of Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media for the series Chernobyl. Hildur won an Emmy for the score in September, and was named Television Composer of the Year at the World Soundtrack Awards last October. Hildur is currently nominated for an Oscar for her film score for Joker.

Emmy win, Oscar and BAFTA nominations

The Chernobyl score was created using field recordings from a nuclear power plant. It beat out four other nominees in the category, including Alan Silvestri’s Avengers: Endgame, and Hans Zimmer’s score for The Lion King. Hildur’s statue collection could receive a couple more additions next month: she has been nominated for a BAFTA Award and an Oscar for her score for the acclaimed Joker. The BAFTAs will be presented on February 2 and the Oscars on February 9.

First solo Icelander to win a Grammy?

Only one Icelander has previously won a Grammy award: violinist Sigurbjörn Bernharðsson, who won as part of Pacifica Quartet for the group’s 2008 recording of Elliott Carter’s String Quartets No. 1 & 5. In 2018, both the band Kaleo and Hildur’s former collaborator Jóhann Jóhannsson were nominated for Grammy awards. Björk, unsurprisingly, also belongs to the group of Icelandic Grammy nominees – she holds the distinction of being the female artist with the most Grammy nominations without a win: 15.

Iceland Review interviewed Hildur about her work on both Joker and Chernobyl.

 

Note: A previous version of this article incorrectly stated that Hildur was the first Icelander to win a Grammy.

Notes From a Small Island – A Hollywood Composer’s Life in Akureyri

Composer Atli Örvarsson

If you were a successful film and TV composer, working with the likes of Hans Zimmer and Mike Post creating scores for some of the US’ biggest films, living in sunny California – would you pack up your whole life and move your family to a town of 18.000 people, just 90 km south of the arctic circle, with no film industry to speak of? That’s exactly what Atli Örvarsson did when he moved back to his hometown Akureyri three years ago. Just a few years ago, that would have meant an end to his career, but in this day and age, anything is possible.

This content is only visible under subscription. Subscribe here or log in.

Continue reading