Björk Announces Cancellation of Reykjavík Concert Series

Singer Björk

Björk’s advertised concert series in Reykjavík in June has been cancelled due to production problems. All concertgoers will have their tickets refunded.

Irresolvable production issues

In February of this year, Icelandic singer Björk announced plans to hold a series of concerts at the Laugardalshöll Stadium on June 7, 10, and 13.

As noted in an article on Vísir, the concerts were to last two hours and feature music from her albums Utopia and Fossora. “This is the biggest show that Björk has ever done and will boast one of the more numerous assembly of digital screens on a single stage.”

Yesterday, however, Björk announced that she was calling the concert off. “There have been problems with the production of the concert that we do not expect to be able to solve in time. We realise that this will disappoint ticket holders and apologise for the inconvenience this may cause,” a press release from Björk states.

“We are determined to do everything we can to prevent this from happening again and will review our processes with this in mind. We still hope to find a way to make the concert a reality next year. However, as it may take weeks or months to resolve all technical and logistical issues, we are forced at this point to cancel and refund.”

Björk Debuts Cornucopia in New York City

Björk will be holding eight performances of her latest staged concert, “Cornucopia,” in New York City over the next month. RÚV reports that the Icelandic government has provided ISK 5 million [$41,196; €36,745] for the Hamrahlið Choir to travel to new York City and take part in the series.

Cornucopia will be performed at The Shed, a new arts and theater space in New York City. Per the description on the website, it is a collaboration between Björk and “a team of digital and theatrical collaborators, including award-winning filmmaker, screenwriter, and director Lucrecia Martel.” The performance will include “live musical arrangements, digital technology, and stunning visuals.” Björk has called Cornucopia is her “finest and most complex concert since getting started.”

The first performance will be held on Monday and the final on June 1. Each performance will have an audience of 1,200 people; all performances have sold out. Joining Björk at each of these performances will be a dozens of Icelandic musicians, such as the Vibra Flute Septet, and 50 members of the Hamrahlið Choir. The exact nature of the concert has been kept quite secret: no one from RÚV, for instance, was allowed to take photos during a recent Hamrahlið rehearsal for the upcoming event.