Top 10 Apps for Your Trip to Iceland

Kirkjufell and Kirkjufellsfossar on Snæfellsnes Peninsula, Iceland

Hreyfill: the taxi app

Hreyfill is one of the largest taxi companies in Iceland. With their app, you can order a cab to your address and see the car’s location in real-time. Unlike Hopp Taxi, you disclose your destination to the taxi driver, not through the app. Therefore, you will see the final price once you arrive at your destination. The payment goes through the cab driver, not the app. If you would like to get a price estimate first, you can call Hreyfill Taxi at +354-588-5522. 

SafeTravel

The SafeTravel app will give you all the information you need to travel safely in Iceland, such as Icelandic road regulations, traffic signs, road closures and weather warnings. It enables you to register your location at any given time, so if you go on a hike and get lost, the app can provide the authorities with your last reported coordinates so they can find you more easily. You can directly connect to emergency services through the app.

Traffic jam in snow storm in Iceland
Photo: The SafeTravel app will keep you updated on weather and road conditions.

Hopp: getting from A to B

Hopp is an app for three types of transportation. It offers electric scooter rentals, car sharing and ride sharing. There are many scooter rental stations in Iceland. You can use the app to rent one for a limited time and then return it to any Hopp scooter station. Car sharing allows you to rent a car for a shorter period, much like Zipcar. These cars are located at various places in the capital area. The ride-share option, or Hopp Taxi, is similar to Uber. You can order a car through the app, and by choosing your destination, you will see the price before confirming. The cost will then be deducted from your payment method through the app.

Klappið: getting from A to B for less

Klappið is the public bus app which allows you to buy tickets and plan your ride by entering your start location, destination and departure time. You can see the bus’ location in real-time. As of 2024, the price for a standard bus ticket is ISK 630 [$4.60, €4.20]. You can pay the fare by entering your card information in the app.

Bus in Reykjavík, Iceland
Photo: Lækjartorg bus stop in Reykjavík.

Kringum Iceland: fun facts all around you

The Kringum app teaches you about various sites, fun facts and events around you. You can look at the map and see icons marking each site. When you click them, you will see information and stories about the given subject and get directions on how to get there. Aside from the map, you can go to a list that shows the nearby sites, with the closest ones listed first. 

Parka: parking made simple

The Parka app enables you to pay for parking from your phone, so there’s no need to search for an automat. The app will show you which parking zone you are in using the location function, ensuring you pay the correct fee. It will list locations such as parking garages, street parking and car washes. You connect your card to the app for payment. Once you park your car, you check in through the app, and when you return to your vehicle, you check out. The app will then charge you a prorated price based on the time you used the parking spot. Note that this app can also be used for reserving camping sites

Wikiloc: hiking trails in Iceland

The Wikiloc app offers detailed hiking trails, which you can find on their map or by using filters to create a list. You will see the elevation, distance and difficulty level of each trail, ranked and reviewed by travellers. The app includes offline maps that can come in handy if you lose cell phone reception in the wilderness.

Kleifarvatn, Iceland
Photo: Golli. The Wikiloc app will guide you on adventurous hikes.

Google Translate

This popular app can be very useful during your travels in Iceland. Sometimes, instructions or descriptions are only listed in Icelandic. With this app, you can hover your phone’s camera over the text you need translating, and in seconds, you will have the text written in your language. In addition, you can translate sentences via text or verbally and have the app read the text out loud.

Icelandic Coupons

This app offers coupons for restaurants, bars, shops, and activities. The offers include 2-for-1 deals and percentage discounts, making your time in Iceland more economical. You can use free coupons or buy a collection for ISK 1,380 [$10, €9.20]. Search for coupons anywhere in Iceland or turn on the location feature to see nearby deals. Simply download the app, start scrolling, and then activate the offer once it’s time to pay for the service.

Red Cross First Aid

This app provides instructions for first aid on the go, with no internet connection needed. You select the emergency from a list, and the app will give step-by-step instructions on how to best care for the injury. Having first aid in the palm of your hand can save a life and is especially helpful when you’re out of town and must wait longer for assistance. In some instances, the app instructs to dial 911, but note that the emergency hotline in Iceland is 112.

 

Municipal Bus To Introduce Touch-Free System

Reykjavík city bus.

Strætó, the Reykjavík area public transit company, aims to at last introduce a touch-free payment system. Jóhannes Svavar Rúnarsson, the managing director of Strætó, says that the new system should be in place within the next two or three weeks.

Klappið app

Currently, payments for the city bus are done primarily through three methods: cash, the phone app Klapp or the printed bus card of the same name. The latter two use a QR code and scanner to process payments.

The initial launch of the app was not without its hiccups, and Jóhannes hopes that the new system will be easier for all involved, especially tourists.

“We’re pressing ahead diligently to get [the new system] done before the tourist season,” he told RÚV. “This is obviously comfortable for everyone, and simple for foreign tourists to pay fares on the bus.”

Testing before launch

Jóhannes says that they have been working with a supplier who is to provide Strætó with the touch-free system, meaning that passengers will be able to pay for fares with debit cards or the phones, through the use of Google Wallet and similar apps, much like one would pay for anything else in a shop.

“There are still a few things that need to be tweaked in order for this to be completely safe or work properly,” he said, adding that their supplier told them they should be able to start testing this new system within the next two or three weeks.

BSÍ: Reykjavík’s Main Bus Terminal

BSÍ Bus station in Reykjavík Iceland

BSÍ is the main transportation hub for tours and travel within the country. BSÍ stands for Bifreiðastöð Íslands, or “Iceland’s vehicle station.” It serves as the headquarters for Reykjavík Excursions. The terminal is a departure and arrival point for various tours, the Hop On- Hop Off Reykjavík sightseeing bus, airport transfers, and public buses connecting the city, suburbs and rural areas. The station also offers free Wi-Fi, camping equipment rental, taxi services, car rentals, refreshments and luggage storage. A range of information is available at the travel desk, including maps and guides. BSÍ is located just 1.5 km [0.9 mi] from Reykjavík Domestic Airport in the city centre. 

The history of BSÍ

BSÍ opened in 1965. Apart from being the country’s primary hub for coaches, it was a place people would gather after a night of partying, as the famous BSÍ drive-through kiosk was the only place selling food 24 hours a day. After the bars closed, people would reconvene at the kiosk and eat Icelandic delights such as hot dogs, sandwiches with smoked meat and pea salad, or sviðakjammar (smoked, boiled sheep’s heads). The classic combo of a boiled sheep’s head, mashed beets and Coca-Cola remained the shop’s signature meal until it closed in 2017, leaving behind enough stories to last a lifetime.

Sviðakjammi
Photo: The smoked, boiled sheep’s head was BSÍ’s kiosk’s signature meal.

In Iceland, it was customary for children and teenagers to be sent to the farms in the summertime to help with chores, as the schools were closed from mid-May to the beginning of September. Parents would drop their children off at the corresponding coach at BSÍ at the beginning of the summer and then pick them up from there shortly before schools started up again. 

What buses depart from the BSÍ bus terminal?

Local buses for Reykjavík and its suburbs depart from the bus stop on Gamla Hringbraut road, one block north. The routes that stop there are 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 15, in addition to the public bus that takes you to Keflavík Airport, Route 55. The Flybus airport transfer departs and arrives at the BSÍ bus terminal by the other coaches.

BSÍ is the place to start if you want to go on an excursion, rent a car or seek general information to get the most out of your trip to Iceland. It conveniently has lockers and luggage storage, making it easier to explore Iceland while you await your airport transfer or accommodation check-in time.

Lockers

You can rent luggage lockers at BSÍ for up to three days between June 1st and September 14th and up to 30 days from September 15th to May 31st. The price is per 24 hours and is determined by size and total rental period. As of 2024, the price ranges from a key-locker at ISK 490 [$3.60, €3.30] to an extra large locker fitting two suitcases and a backpack for ISK 3,990 [$29, €27].

BSÍ Luggage Lockers
Photo: The luggage lockers at BSÍ Bus Terminal.

How To Travel Around Reykjavík 

Reykjavík from above, housing crisis Iceland

Knowing how to get around Reykjavík, Iceland’s capital city, is essential for those hoping to truly maximise their visit. So what transportation options are available, and how much do they cost? 

Despite being home to over two-thirds of Iceland’s population, Reykjavík has a reputation for being a small capital city. This assessment is not entirely unfair; compared to the majority of other capitals around the world, the city could hardly be described as a metropolis. 

With that said, it still covers 232 sq km [144 mi,] often surprising those who bought into the misconception that Reykjavík is little more than a “quaint fishing town.”

A child rides a segway through Reykjavík
Photo: Golli. There are many creative ways to explore Reykjavík.

Thankfully, many of the most beloved attractions, be it the Sun Voyager sculpture, Harpa Concert Hall, or Hallgrímskirkja Lutheran Church, are all within easy walking distance from one another. 

However, other notable stops, like Perlan Museum, Árbær Open Air Museum, and Nauthólsvík Geothermal Beach require a little more research into the transportation possibilities. To mention it briefly, City Sightseeing Reykjavík offers a hop-on, hop-off service that will take you to many of the best sites across the city.

Without further ado, let’s delve into the many ways you can travel across Reykjavík without breaking the bank!   

All About Public Transport Buses in Iceland 

Public bus in Reykjavík
Photo: Golli. Buses in Reykjavík are recognisable thanks to their bright yellow colour

Without trains or an underground tube service, Reykjavík’s residents must rely on city buses to get from A to B. The country’s only public transport company is called Strætó. They operate several bus lines throughout the city. As an aside, Strætó is an abbreviation of the word Strætisvagn, which translates to ‘street car.’ 

Hlemmur bus terminal is the major interchange for Strætó. The majority of bus lines pass through here. In 2017, the terminal’s building was transformed into a popular food hall, Hlemmur Mathöll, and is easily accessible at the bottom of Laugavegur. 

This renovation has been something of a blessing, having transformed what was once one of the more run-down areas of the city into someplace quite special. Why not make the most of it by grabbing a tasty bite while waiting for your next bus? 

A man using the klapp app in Reykjavík
Photo: Golli. A man waits for the bus in Reykjavík

It is always wise to check their website regularly to keep up to date with timetables and disruptions (many of the city’s residents will be happy to tell you that Strætó does not have the greatest reputation when it comes to reliability.) 

You can also use the app’s route-planner to help strategize your journey and see at which stops you might have to change buses.

You’ll instantly be able to recognise Strætó buses thanks to their canary-yellow colour. There are a vast number of bus stops across the city and beyond, with some being shelters, while others are a mere signpost. 

If you need to contact the company directly, you can reach their customer service by email at [email protected], or by telephone at +354 540 2700. 

How much does public transport cost in Reykjavík? 

public transportation iceland
Photo: Golli. Bus fares will cost more starting January 8 2024

If you have the cash handy, you can buy tickets on the bus directly. But, in an age where cards over coins has become the new standard, securing your route this way can often be more hassle than it’s worth. 

Naturally, one would think that a bus fare could be bought directly through Strætó’s app, but this is actually not the case. In fact, tickets are most widely purchased through a separate app, Klappið.

As of January 8, 2024, a single adult bus fare costs 630 kr [$4.60, €4.20]. Children between 12 – 17 years old, and adults above 67 years old, only have to pay 315 kr, while those 11 years old and younger are permitted to ride for free. Also, travellers with disabilities have a discounted rate at 189 kr when paid through Klappið. 

Both the Klappið and Strætó apps can be downloaded through the Apple Store or Google Play.

If you’re planning on staying in the capital for a while, another option might be the Reykjavik City Card. Not only does it permit you entry into the city’s museums, art galleries, and swimming pools, but it allows you unlimited rides on Strætó. The Reykjavik City Card comes in three varieties; 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. 

What is Hopp in Iceland? 

Hopp scooters in front of Mount Esja in Reykjavík
Photo: Hopp Reykjavík. Scooters in front of Reykjavík’s Mount Esja.

Founded in Reykjavík in 2019, the micro mobility company, Hopp, provides its residents and guests a means to travel across the city by way of shared electric scooters, cars, and taxis. 

With a focus on sustainable travel and ease of access, Hopp is perfectly suited for travellers hoping to keep their trip to Iceland as carbon neutral as possible. 

Hopp vehicles of all shapes and sizes are now as common a sight around the city as souvenir stores, and have quickly become part of the fabric that makes up the Reykjavík tapestry. 

 

Renting a Hopp scooter costs ISK 115 up front, then ISK 39 a minute afterwards, making it a very affordable way of travelling short distances. Payment is all done through the app. 

As mentioned, Hopp also operates a taxi service, following a similar model to Uber in other countries. While this is a new operation, visitors to Iceland can check their driver’s rating before booking a ride. 

The Hopp app can be downloaded through Google Play or the Apple Store.   

Should I Rent a Car in Reykjavík? 

Renting a car can be a great way to get around Reykjavík
Photo: Golli. Renting a car is a good option for exploring Reykjavík city.

For the greatest freedom, renting a car remains the optimum choice. Not only does it allow you to set your own schedule, but also change your plans on the fly should the need arise.

There are a variety of vehicle options available depending on your requirements. If you’re planning on leaving the capital to head out to the Highlands during summer, do note that a 4X4 will be necessary so as not to become stranded on loose gravel, or midway through a deceptively deep river. 

Read more on driving in Iceland:

How to park in Reykjavík? 

Aerial view of Reykjavík city traffic during winter
Photo: Golli. Aerial view of Reykjavík city traffic during winter

As is often the case with capital cities, finding a place to park in Reykjavík can often be challenging. Fear not, for there are ways of mitigating this frustration, saving you unnecessary circles around downtown, and the predictable spilling of curse words.

What’s important to realise is that Reykjavík has four parking zones, each with different rates and time slots depending on where they are. Designated by signs stating, P1, P2, P3, and P4, it’s good to know that Parking Zone 1 is the most expensive, and the most central to the city. From each number out, the respective charge becomes less, but the distance furthers. 

When using a ticket machine to pay for parking, make sure to keep your licence plate number on hand. Note that not all parking machines will print a ticket, but this does not present an issue; parking attendants scan licence plates to check that a fare has been paid. 

However, oftentimes, finding a ticking machine is unnecessary. Actually, the easiest way to pay for parking in Iceland is through the mobile application, Parka. You can download the app on both the App Store and Google Play. 

Can you travel around Reykjavík by foot? 

Reykjavík walking district laugavegur
Photo: Golli. Pedestrians walking down Reykjavík’s busiest street, Laugavegur

Another great option is simply traversing Reykjavík by foot. For those remaining central to the city, Iceland’s capital is a fantastic place for walking, not only for its cleanliness and pleasant ambience, but for the way major port-of-calls are laid out. 

This is particularly true of Miðborg, the city’s downtown district, which is undoubtedly the cultural hub given its concentrations of shops, restaurants, and museums. 

Reykjavík’s most popular shopping streets are Laugavegur and Skólavörðustígur, both found in Miðborg. 

Skólavörðustígur leads right up to Hallgrímskirkja church, and is better known as “Rainbow Street” due to the vibrant colours painted along its lower section. You’ll find a variety of easy going cafes and restaurants as well, as well as kitsch souvenir and grocery shops.

Pedestrians outside of Hallgrímskirkja church.
Photo: Golli. Pedestrians enjoy a walk in Reykjavík.

Laugavegur is the street most dense with foot traffic; for all intents and purposes, it begins at Hlemmur bus terminal and ends at Lækjartorg intersection, just a short way away from Harpa Concert Hall. Over recent years, vehicle traffic has been restricted on large sections of Laugavegur to help incentivise residents and travellers to walk.

Walking from Miðborg to neighbouring Grandi, home to the picturesque Old Harbour, takes approximately twenty minutes. This is a lovely stroll in itself, allowing great views of Reykjavík’s coastline and residential districts. 

Over recent years, efforts have been made to popularise Grandi among visitors, hosting such interesting stops as FlyOver Iceland, and the museums,  Whales of Iceland and Reykjavík Maritime Museum. There are also supermarkets, restaurants, and ice cream parlours nearby, as well as the iconic Kaffivagninn, Iceland’s oldest cafe. 

How to take a Taxi in Reykjavík? 

Taxi in Iceland's capital, Reykjavík
Photo: Golli. Taxis in Reykjavík

Sometimes, you’ll want to avoid the stress of planning your journey and instead leave it to those who know the city like the back of their hand. Fortunately, there are several taxi companies that operate 24/7 in Reykjavík. 

While this is by far the most expensive option from getting from place to place, it can sometimes be a useful option, especially late in the evening, or when no other transport options are available.

The two most respected taxi companies in Reykjavík are Hreyfill, founded in 1943, and BSR, which was founded in 1921. 

Hreyfill +354 588 5522

BSR +354 561 0000

In Summary 

A bridge in Reykjavík during summer.
Photo: Golli. However you travel, Reykjavík is a fantastic city to explore!

However you choose to explore Iceland’s gorgeous capital, you are sure to quickly fall in love with the city. The pace of life is slower here. And despite it very much being a city, travellers will pick up on its laid-back atmosphere. 

While transportation is an important facet of every vacation abroad, spend your time here at a leisurely pace. Still, remember that there are many options for how you choose to get around Reykjavík. But make sure to pick those that best suit your itinerary. 

Does Iceland Have Uber?

Hopp car share Reykjavík

Uber has not arrived in Iceland yet. However, there is a new, similar company called Hopp Taxis. The company is known as an electric scooter rental but recently introduced their car-sharing service and Hopp Taxis. You can download the Hopp app on both Apple and Android free of charge, and there is no subscription fee. It works like Uber; you can see the car’s location, arrival time, and price before confirming the ride, and the payment is made through the app. The drivers are all licensed taxi drivers and drive carbon-neutral or electric cars. Currently, Hopp Taxi operates in Reykjavík and its closest suburbs, such as Kópavogur, Garðabær, Hafnarfjörður, and Mosfellsbær, as well as Keflavík airport.

Taking the taxi in Reykjavík

Another option is to take a regular taxi. Taxi companies, such as Hreyfill and BSR, offer apps you can download to order a cab and monitor its location. The taxis have a much wider service area. Unlike Hopp Taxis, you will know the price once you have arrived at your destination, and the payment goes directly through the taxi driver, not the app. Note that taking taxis to and from Keflavík International can be expensive. An average taxi trip from the capital region to the airport may run from ISK 15,000 – 20,000 [$110-146, €100-134], so budget-minded travellers may find the Fly Bus a more economical option.

Iceland’s bus system

Iceland’s bus system, Strætó, is a great, economical transportation choice. You can plan your trip and see more comprehensive route maps on their website. To pay the fare, buy a ticket through the app Klappið or pay the exact amount in cash on the bus. About half of the buses in the capital area run from 6:30 AM to midnight, but some services may start later and end earlier. A night bus on Friday and Saturday nights runs from downtown Reykjavík to some of its surrounding suburbs. Note that the night route only runs from Reykjavík, not towards it.

Near Miss with Bus on Wrong Side of Road Captured on Dashcam

A bus driving on the wrong side of the road on Reykjanesbrautin.

Drivers on Reykjanesbrautin yesterday narrowly avoided a collision when they encountered a bus driving towards them on the wrong side of the road. The bus was under the care of a repair shop, whose owner attributed the incident to “human error.”

Narrowly avoided a collision

A driver and his passenger were considerably startled yesterday as they drove along Reykjanesbraut – the road leading from the capital area to the Keflavík International Airport – and encountered a bus coming towards them at full speed on the wrong side of the road. As can be seen in the accompanying video from Mbl.is below, cars had to quickly swerve to the side to allow the bus to pass.

 

“We had the camera on the dashboard running, as always, and suddenly we saw the cars ahead of us dart to the side and then this bus coming towards us on the opposite side of the barrier,” driver Haraldur Ingþórsson told Mbl.is yesterday.

As reported by Vísir today, the bus in question was under the care of the vehicle repair shop Vélrás. The company owner told Vísir that it had been a matter of “human error” and that the matter would be dealt with internally.

The bus company Arctic Oro was initially implicated in the incident after netizens traced the bus’s licence plate to the company. The owner of the bus company told Vísir that the company had suffered significant reputational damage due to the incident; the truth was that the bus was being repaired at the aforementioned workshop, and an employee of the workshop had been driving the bus.

Major Changes to Reykjavík Bus Routes

Strætó bus Reykjavík miðborgin umferð fólk

There will be major changes to Reykjavík bus routes in the coming months due to construction at Hlemmur, the main bus terminal in downtown Reykjavík. All bus routes in the area will be temporarily diverted and new end stops will be implemented on each route. When construction is complete, only four bus routes will stop at Hlemmur and there will be no central end stop for Reykjavík bus routes.

End stops move to Grandi, Skúlagata, and the University of Iceland

A notice from Reykjavík public bus service operator Strætó outlines the changes to routes due to the construction at Hlemmur. The end stops of routes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 16, 17 and 18 will move from Hlemmur to Skúlagata, Grandi and HÍ (University of Iceland).

Route 3 will use Grandi as an end stop. Routes 1, 4, 16, 17 and 18 will temporarily make their final stop in Skúlagata street, a new terminal station in the city. Routes 2 and 6 will temporarily end at the University of Iceland. All of the new routes can be seen in detail on the Strætó website.

Read more about public transport funding in Iceland and Reykjavík’s planned Borgarlína bus rapid transit system.

Hazardous Road Conditions in the North

winter tires reykjavík

Roads across Iceland are out of commission today due to harsh winter weather. Conditions are especially bad in the north and Holtavörðuheiði, a part of the Ring Road between the capital area and Akureyri, has been closed, RÚV reports.

Buses postponed or cancelled

Bus trips operated by Strætó have been postponed or cancelled this morning. Bus 57 at 10:15 from Akureyri to Reykjavík was cancelled. The bus travelling in the opposite direction at 9:00, from Mjódd in Reykjavík going north, only made it to Borgarnes.

Routes 78 and 79, between Siglufjörður and Akureyri, and Húsavík and Akureyri, respectively, have been postponed for an indefinite period. Route 59 between Borgarnes and Hólmavík has also been postponed.

Many roads out of commission

In the northeast, the road over Möðrudalsöræfi has been closed and Öxnadalsheiði road is out of commission as well. According to the Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration, blinding snowfall and difficult driving conditions are to be expected in many areas, especially Vatnsskarð and Þverárfjall.

The snowfall is expected to decrease tonight. However, driving conditions in Skagafjörður will get worse today and roads could be closed later on. Slippery surfaces, poor visibility and hail can be expected on roads in the area.

Bus Fares to Rise by 11 Percent

public transportation iceland

Strætó, the public transport company which operates city buses in the Reykjavík capital region, has announced a new price structure. The change comes into effect on January 8 and bus fares will rise by 11 percent on average, Viðskiptablaðið reports.

A single fare will now cost ISK 630 [$4.60, €4.20], up from ISK 570 [$4.20, €3.80]. Strætó last raised its prices in September of 2022, when a single fare cost ISK 490 [$3.60, €3.30], citing higher fuel prices. This amounts to a 29 percent hike in the 16 month period.

No price changes outside of the capital area

The decision was made by the Strætó board, according to a press release, and ratified by the ownership committee, representatives of the six capital area municipalities who own the company. They are Reykjavík, Kópavogur, Hafnarfjörður, Garðabær, Mosfellsbær and Seltjarnarnes.

“The operational status of Strætó was considered before making the decision, as the accumulative effects of the Covid pandemic can still be felt,” the press release said. “The higher prices also help alleviate higher operating costs for Strætó and increased payroll costs and reduce the need to cut back on Strætó services in the capital area.”

The new price structure only applies to Strætó’s capital area routes and no changes have been made to the prices for routes outside of the capital area.

Public Transport Woes Over Pride Weekend

strætó bus reykjavík

Overfilled buses led to some inconvenience this past weekend as Reykjavík celebrated its annual Pride Parade, reports Vísir.

With downtown Reykjavík filled with festivities, many capital area residents chose to take the bus instead of parking during a busy weekend. In fact, Reykjavík Pride claims to have had a record number of attendees this time around.

However, reports of overcrowded buses and long wait times show that Strætó was not able to keep up with increased demand, with Vísir reporting that some capital area residents simply gave up after being passed by five full buses.

Jóhannes Svavar Rúnarsson, a spokesperson for Strætó, stated to Vísir that Strætó followed their normal weekend schedule during Pride. There had been a discussion about whether to increase the service, similar to what’s done on Culture Night (Menningarnótt), but due to a shortage of funds, nothing was done.

Jóhannes continued, saying  “we know of very many who didn’t get a spot. Many buses were just filling up.”

He stated that there will be further discussion next year about whether the bus service should be adjusted to meet the demand during the Pride Parade.

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