More Overnight Stays Booked This June Than Pre-Pandemic

Icelandair Marina Hotel

Foreign tourists booked 405,000 overnight stays in Icelandic hotels in June 2022, which is an increase of 6%, or roughly 23,000 more stays than were booked in June 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic. Túristi reports that there was also a jump in hotel bookings among Icelanders, with just over 91,000 overnight stays booked in June 2022, as compared to 38,000 in June 2019.

These were among the findings in a new report issued by Statistics Iceland on Friday.

Americans have had by far the most overnight bookings in Iceland over the years: 127,163 in 2019 up to 140,651 in 2022, for an increase of 11% between the years. Icelanders had the second most overnight bookings in June 2022, or 91,388 to be exact. Percentage-wise, this is the most significant increase by nationality since the pre-pandemic years. Germans had the third most bookings by total in June 2022: 58,453, or a 27% increase from the 46,170 overnight stays they booked in June 2019. In terms of percentage increases, however, Italians had the next highest increase in overnight June bookings after Icelanders: 11,728 in June 2022, or an increase of 89% from 6,200 in June 2019.

The new figures show that between June of this year and last year, 2021, occupancy rates around Iceland went up from 40% to 78.8%. Regionally, the biggest jump in hotel bookings was, unsurprisingly, in the capital region, with 5,400 hotel rooms booked in 2022 versus 3,277 in 2021. The second largest increase was seen in the Southwest: 1,017 in 2022, up from 880 in 2021. East Iceland has seen the least change in overnight stays in the last year, with only two more overnight stays booked in 2022 (441) than in 2021 (439).

Take a look at a summary of Statistics Iceland’s new overnight stay data on their website, in English, here.

Man Killed in Avalanche in North Iceland Yesterday

fatal accident Iceland

A man died in an avalanche in Svarfaðardalur in North Iceland yesterday. The man was travelling with two others, both of whom sustained severe injuries.

“Well-equipped, experienced mountaineers”

Three American men, born in 1988, were caught in an avalanche in Svarfaðardalur, North Iceland, yesterday.

After one of them notified emergency responders (at 19:10 yesterday), an emergency helicopter was dispatched, along with rescue teams from Dalvík, Siglufjörður, and Akureyri.

According to a FB post by the police in Northeast Iceland, the three men were “well-equipped, experienced mountaineers,” and all of them sustained severe injuries; one of the men was pronounced dead on the scene.

Further detail not available

The other two men were transported to a hospital in Akureyri, with one later being taken to the National University Hospital in Reykjavík. Details on their condition have not been made public.

Approximately 130 rescue workers took part in the search, which concluded shortly before midnight.

“It took some time to gather information about the man’s family in the US,” the police in Northeast Iceland stated. “Once we had obtained that information, the US Embassy helped inform the man’s loved ones about his death. The deceased was single and had no children.”

An investigation into the events is underway.

Iceland’s First Hamburger Was Sold in 1941

Hamburger and fries in Iceland

The first hamburger may have been sold in Iceland as early as 1941, Vísir reports. Visitors to the island may be more likely to think of lamb soup or cod cheeks when thinking of classic Icelandic fare, but while these are certainly more homegrown dishes, the country has long maintained a love affair with the hamburger. As such, Iceland’s preeminent food historian, Nanna Rögnvaldardóttir, has set out to determine when and where this delicacy was first sold to hungry Icelanders.

Nanna has been outlining her research for Vísir and also in televised interviews, which has yielded a great deal of information from the public about early sightings of the fast food favorite. In October 1956, Kjörbar in downtown Reykjavík started advertising “hamburgers all day” and a rest stop grill near the Hvítá bridge in West Iceland also had them on the menu. A restaurant called Ísborg in downtown Reykjavík began selling burgers and French fries in 1957. The much-beloved rest stop grill and gas station Staðarskáli began serving up hamburgers during the summer of 1960. And in January of the same year, a restaurant called Smárabar in the Westman Islands started advertising them on their menu.

Fittingly, it now seems that the earliest documented hamburger in Iceland was likely sold at a restaurant on Aðalstræti, Reykjavík’s oldest street.

“The American army arrived in July 1941,” notes Nanna, “and that same month, they start offering hamburgers there.”

There are also stories of American soldiers teaching Jakobína Ámundadóttir, the owner of a cafe near Öskjuhlíð (the hill on which Perlan is located), how to make hamburgers during the war years. According to her sister Íris, Jakobína opened her café when the British built their base on the site of the Reykjavík Domestic airport and intended it to serve Icelanders who worked on the base. When the American soldiers arrived, however, they craved burgers and French fries from home and in addition to teaching Jakobína how to make a hamburger are said to have also baked hamburger buns for her to try as well.

These early hamburger-adopters would have been among several places that advertised burgers in newspapers that were published specially for servicemen, such as The Daily Post and The White Falcon.

Even as the meal gained popularity at cafes serving soldiers stationed in Iceland, however, it does not seem to have made a big impression on Icelanders as a whole for close to ten years. In a travel article written by Vísir journalist Thorolf Smith after a trip to America in 1952, for example, he describes hamburgers as a strange, unknown phenomenon: “some kind of ground beefsteak between two pieces of bread.” Another news article describes an Icelandic man’s shock at being served a hamburger for dinner by the chef of a canteen at the American base in Keflavík.

Nanna says that the American base in Keflavík became the de facto home of the hamburger in Iceland, but that by 1956, it had made its way to Reykjavík and had given rise to a number of hamburger joints, such as those mentioned above. All of these early restaurants are closed now, except for the Staðarskáli rest stop and grill. Nanna believes that it’s likely that Staðarskáli holds the honor of being the place that has sold hamburgers longest in Iceland.

Americans Make Up 40% of All June Visitors

tourists on perlan

New statistics published by the Icelandic Tourist Board show that almost 234,000 people departed from Keflavík airport in June, Kjarninn reports. This is 12,000 more travelers than flew out of the airport in June of last year.

This represents a 5.4% increase between 2017 and 2018, which is a far smaller increase than the airport saw between 2016 and 2017.

The figures also show that Americans made up two of every five travelers and made up 40% of all travelers in Iceland. This is a 29.1% increase from last year. In 2014, 21,000 Americans traveled to Iceland versus the current figure of almost 93,000 Americans a year. Germans tied with Scandinavians for the next largest groups of travelers departing from Keflavík, although the number of Germans visiting Iceland has gone down in recent years.

So far in 2018, a million foreign travelers have departed from Keflavík airport.