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19.02

What it's like to drown
Fiction

What It’s Like To Drown

Friðgeir Einarsson has published three books; one novel and two short story collections. He has also attracted attention within the Icelandic performing arts scene as an actor, director, and author with performance groups including 16 Lovers and Kriðpleir. His play Club Romantica was premiered at the Reykjavík City Theatre earlier this year and has received praise from both viewers and critics. What It’s Like to Drown first appeared in his book Ég hef séð svona áður (I’ve Seen This Before) in 2018.

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Culture

For Art’s Sake

Akureyri is the largest town outside of the Capital Area but its 18,000 inhabitants still make for a relatively small town in an international context. But a sense of identity can’t be quantified in numbers only and Akureyri has a long and rich culture and history.

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Akureyri Art Museum
Culture

For Art’s Sake

“A Community of 18,000 building a museum like this? It’s a big project.”

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guitar
Culture

The Guitar is Dead

If you only read the headlines, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the guitar is having a tough time recently. After all, electric guitar sales have been steadily declining for some time. Today, the guitar heroes of yore seem to have been replaced by laptop-wielding electronic producers and perennial mega pop stars. On May 1, 2018, the Gibson company, one of the most celebrated and well-known guitar manufacturers in the world, filed for bankruptcy protection, sending shockwaves through the music industry and sparking all kinds of speculation about the future of the six-stringed instrument. “I don’t know. Maybe the guitar is over,” Eric Clapton himself wondered in an interview.

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Author Einar Kárason.
Culture

Telling Tales

“Actually, that’s a good story, let me tell you…” Speaking to author Einar Kárason, that’s a phrase you can expect to hear often – and the stories usually are good.

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icelandic sheep
Business

Homespun

As national symbols go, the sheep isn’t the flashiest of them all. In fact, most tourists prefer the cute and cuddly puffin to adorn their commemorative key chains and fridge magnets rather than the trusty sheep. Throughout history, however, the animal that has earned the love and respect of Icelanders is the sheep. It enjoys high cultural status, not just as a staple in the traditional Icelandic diet, but also for keeping locals warm.

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Magazine

Wasting Away: How Iceland is dealing with its waste

The inhabitants of the Western world are consumers. It is no secret that we produce more than we need and throw away more than we should. In a world where mass production is the norm, it is not a surprise that we are drowning in garbage. Our overconsumption has led to plastic in our oceans, massive deforestation, and let’s not talk about animal extinction.

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Geosea Baths Húsavík
Culture

Natural by Design

You may not know it but when visiting Iceland, you’re likely to encounter the work of Basalt Architects. The company’s team is behind the Blue Lagoon’s Retreat hotel, the GeoSea Geothermal Sea Baths in Húsavík, and the LAVA Centre volcano museum in Hvolsvöllur, to name a few projects. Basalt Architects have flipped the script in architecture, letting nature lead the way in construction. Established in 2009, the company has revamped Icelandic bathing culture, focusing on putting people into touch with nature.

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