Korriró, Baby

It explained a lot when Snæfríður figured out that there were trolls in her apartment. The discomfort she’d felt over the last few months was vague, but real. Respiratory infections. Chronic fatigue. Panic attacks.            She went online immediately and looked up an exterminator.            The exterminator was more attractive than she’d expected. He had a silver […]

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Plentiful Sea: Rethinking the ocean’s output

Seaweed harvesting Iceland

Seventy per cent of the Earth is covered by water – that’s 361,132,000km2 (139,434,000mi2) of water, to be exact – and considering the fact that a large part of the ocean is uncharted, there is a lot we don’t know about it. What we do know, is that the ocean is a vast source of resources and its abundance is very important.

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Changing Lanes, Part 3: The Future of Urban Planning in Reykjavík

housing Reykjavík

At the beginning of the 20th century, only 8,221 called the northernmost capital city in the world home. That number now stands at 217,711 people, and Reykjavík’s population has grown by 37% since 1998. Unlike many of its European counterparts, you’d be hard-pressed to find rows of houses built earlier than the 19th century. The […]

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Changing Lanes, Part 2: The Future of Urban Planning in Reykjavík

Reykjavík is a city still finding its feet. It’s unique in many ways, pencilled onto a peninsula that stretches westwards into the Atlantic Ocean towards Greenland. Far from a populous metropolis, its surface area nevertheless stretches further than its meagre population would suggest. It offers closeness to nature, along with clean air, water, and energy. Still, there’s an airport right in the city centre. But changes are afoot in the city.

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Changing Lanes, Part 1: The Future of Urban Planning in Reykjavík

Anna María Bogadóttir, architect.

Reykjavík is a city still finding its feet. It’s unique in many ways, pencilled onto a peninsula that stretches westwards into the Atlantic Ocean towards Greenland. Far from a populous metropolis, its surface area nevertheless stretches further than its meagre population would suggest. It offers closeness to nature, along with clean air, water, and energy. Still, there’s an airport right in the city centre. But changes are afoot in the city.

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Therapy for All

Kara Connect - Þorbjörg Helga Vigfúsdóttir

It’s a dark winter morning in Bíldudalur, a small, isolated town in the remote Westfjords, and 10-year-old Anna is preparing for a video meeting with a speech therapist to work on her lisp. While her classmates head to a grammar lesson, Anna works one-on-one with a specialist situated in downtown Reykjavík. That same afternoon, 51-year-old Kjartan sits down for his regularly scheduled appointment with a therapist, who is located in Akureyri, North Iceland. The only therapist in town is a close family friend. Battling with depression, Kjartan has up until now been unable to meet with a specialist. It’s impossible to hire specialists to come to every small town in Iceland – and that’s where Kara Connect comes in. All over Iceland, the start-up is making healthcare accessible to individuals who could not access it before.

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On the Record: Inside Iceland’s music studios

Valgeir Sigurðsson Greenhouse Studios

Long before outsiders looked to Iceland for the latest in music, Icelanders looked outward. Infatuated with American music, locals in the 1950s and 1960s started jazz and rock groups that took to the nation’s stages and made the public dance. While they had their share of performance opportunities, when it came to recording, there were no professional studios in the country.

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Diary of a Powerlifter

Júlían Jóhann Karl Jóhannsson is a 23-year-old who studies history at the University of Iceland and works part-time at a rehab centre for young teenagers. He also currently holds the world record for deadlift in the 120+ kg class, as he lifted 405 kilograms (893lbs) at the 2018 World Open Powerlifting Championships in Halmstad, Sweden. His approach is a meticulous one. Júlían painstakingly takes notes on every training session and every lift in a little notebook. Radiating stoicism, he simply eats, trains – one lift at a time – and sets world records. In a country with a long history of male strength, Júlían is the newest strongman on the block.

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