Staff Shortages Impact Mothers’ Safety, Midwives Say Skip to content
Photo: Golli. Midwives protest for better wages and working conditions, 2018.

Staff Shortages Impact Mothers’ Safety, Midwives Say

The vast majority of midwives in Iceland say mothers’ safety has been put at risk due to staff shortages. Almost one-third of midwives have considered leaving the profession altogether within the last two years. Too much strain, staff shortages, and dissatisfaction with how the shortening of the work week has impacted shift work are all named as key reasons.

The data is from a recent survey by BHM which was commissioned by Icelandic Association of Midwives last month. According to the survey, 85% of midwives say the safety of mothers has been put at risk at some point in the past six months due to staff shortages, and 48% of them say that such incidents happen more often than before.

More strain on shift workers

When asked to consider the last six months, 85% of midwives say they have encountered situations where staffing was not sufficient to ensure minimum safety requirements for patients. This percentage is lower among midwives who work daytime hours (72%) and higher among those who work shifts (93%). Notably, 39% of shift workers stated they have often encountered such situations within the past six months.

Dissatisfaction with impacts of “shortened” work week

Three-quarters of midwives stated that the level of strain they experience on the job is “high” or “very high,” and 70% say that strain has increased over time. These figures are higher among shift workers than daytime workers.

When asked how their working conditions had changed with the shortening of the working week, 54% of midwives working shifts in the public healthcare system believe that working conditions have worsened as a result, while only 30% believe that working conditions have improved. There is great satisfaction with the shortened work week among midwives in daytime work, while dissatisfaction among shift workers is mainly related to a system that financially incentivises them to take more evening and night shifts, as well as the negative effect on work flexibility.

Staff shortages and strain have been an issue across Iceland’s healthcare system for years, including among nurses and in emergency care.

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