Opioid Admissions to Detox Centre on the Rise Skip to content

Opioid Admissions to Detox Centre on the Rise

The Vogur detox centre and rehabilitation hospital has seen a steady rise in admissions due to opioids. Vísir reports that a recent survey conducted by National Centre of Addiction Medicine (SÁÁ) found the supply of opioids in Iceland has increased in recent years and police seized large quantities of OxyContin last year, a situation that has doctors at Vogur particularly concerned.

The percentage of patients admitted to Vogur for opioid addiction has gone up from 22.5% to 27.3% in the last three years. In 2011, the percentage of admissions for opioids was just 10.3%.

Proscribed use of OxyContin has also gone up significantly, even though doctors have more awareness of the risks the drug poses for addiction. At the beginning of 2022, there were 3,500 people registered with OxyContin prescriptions in Iceland. Ten years ago, there were only 500. Ragnheiður Hulda Friðriksdóttir, quality control manager and assistant to the director of Vogur, says that steps are being taken to reduce the number of patients proscribed with the drug, as well as limit its distribution among nonprescription users.

“There are, of course, plenty of people who need these medications, but it’s also common knowledge that people sell medication they don’t need. I know the Icelandic Medicine Agency and the Directorate of Health have been enacting various measures to cut back on this,” stated Ragnheiður Hulda Friðriksdóttir, director of quality control and assistant to the director of Vogur.

Suðurnes Police have seized ever-larger quantities of black-market OxyContin in recent years, but there is strong indication that the drug is widely available to non-prescription users. SÁÁ conducts an annual survey on the price of various narcotics. There has been no noticeable increase in the price of OxyContin in five years, which indicates that the supply is stable and has even gotten bigger in recent years.

The most important thing remains access to treatment, says Ragnheiður Hulda. “That and a limit on access to [opioids] such that they are only proscribed when absolutely necessary. So it’s important that we think about how to wean people off them when they are prescribed.”

Ragnheiður Hulda concluded by saying that Vogur needs additional funds from the Icelandic Health Insurance Office to support the treatment of patients with opioid addiction. The current funding supports the treatment of 90 patients.

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