COVID-19 in Iceland: National Hospital Capacity Key to Third Wave Response Skip to content
National University Hospital Páll Matthíasson
Photo: Almannavarnadeild ríkislögreglustjóra/Facebook.

COVID-19 in Iceland: National Hospital Capacity Key to Third Wave Response

The National University Hospital can handle the projected strain of the current wave of infections, though some reorganisation will be necessary, according to its Director Páll Matthíasson. Páll discussed the hospital’s strengths and weaknesses in tackling the current uptick in COVID-19 hospitalisations at a briefing in Reykjavík this afternoon. Iceland’s current wave of infection will rise slower, fall slower, and last longer than its first wave last spring, says Chief Epidemiologist Þórólfur Guðnason.

Spread of Infection Likely Slowing

Þórólfur stated that the number of daily infections in Iceland and the number of those diagnosed outside of quarantine both appear to be dropping, though slower than expected. Exponential growth of the local pandemic had been successfully avoided, and thus he believes it is unnecessary to impose harsher restrictions, though the situation is being re-evaluated on a regular basis. On the other hand, he stated it was likely that restrictions would be maintained over the coming months as “this virus is not going anywhere.”

Hospital Needs to Free Up Resources

The Chief Epidemiologist’s Office and the National University Hospital have been in communication regarding the challenges the hospital faces in tackling the current wave of COVID-19 infection. Páll stated that while the hospital has many strengths, including well-trained staff and new knowledge and experience in treating COVID patients, it needs to decrease pressure in other wards of the hospital in order to free up resources to deal with the pandemic. The hospital also needs to ensure it is flexible in its organisation and its reserve force of healthcare staff are ready to respond to emergencies. Space and staffing are the biggest challenges currently facing the institution.

Nursing Homes in Good Shape

Most nursing homes and disabled care homes in Iceland are in good shape, according to Þórólfur, and measures implemented to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2 have been largely successful. He added that there have been few severe COVID-19 cases among the elderly and at-risk in this wave of infection.

Chief Superintendent Víðir Reynisson ended the briefing by reminding the public of their personal responsibility in tackling the pandemic. “It is normal to be tired and bored of COVID and want our normal lives back. But we need to stick together to protect those most vulnerable.”

Iceland Review live-tweets Icelandic authorities’ COVID-19 briefings.

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