COVID-19 in Iceland: Fourth Vaccine Arrives on Wednesday Skip to content
First mass vaccination in Laugardalshöll arena.
Photo: Screenshot from ruv.is.

COVID-19 in Iceland: Fourth Vaccine Arrives on Wednesday

Icelandic authorities report that the country is on track to vaccinate 75% of the population by the end of July. A total of 14,541 people received a dose of COVID-19 vaccine in Iceland last week and vaccination efforts are speeding up in line with distribution. Óskar Reykdalsson, Director of Capital Area Healthcare Centres told RÚV the week ahead will be a busy one, with some 5,000-6,000 expected to receive a dose tomorrow.

7.6% are Fully Vaccinated

Vaccination against COVID-19 in Iceland started on December 29, 2020. Of Iceland’s population of 368,590, a total of 61,134 have received at least one dose of vaccine. Of those, 28,056 are fully vaccinated: 7.6% of the population. By the end of April, around 90,000 individuals are expected to have received at least one dose. Authorities have stated they are on track to vaccinate 280,000 people (75% of the population) by mid-July.

Fourth Vaccine Arrives This Week

Iceland’s first shipment of the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 vaccine is scheduled to arrive on Wednesday, containing 2,400 doses. A second shipment of the same size is expected on April 26. The Janssen vaccine is administered in a single dose, unlike the three other vaccines currently in use in Iceland. This means that April shipments of the vaccine will be enough to fully vaccinate 4,800 people.

Those 60-70 and Healthcare Workers Vaccinated This Week

Health authorities in Iceland have been vaccinating according to priority groups defined by the Chief Epidemiologist. The first to receive vaccines were nursing home residents and healthcare workers. Over 95% of locals 80 or older are now fully vaccinated in Iceland, while over 90% of those 70 and older have received at least one dose. This week those 60-70 years of age will be invited to receive the jab, as well as healthcare workers outside of healthcare institutions and people with chronic illnesses, groups five, six, and seven of ten defined priority groups.

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