Teigarhorn: Average Temperature Has Risen 2°C Since 1880s Skip to content
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Teigarhorn: Average Temperature Has Risen 2°C Since 1880s

The average temperature in Teigarhorn, East Iceland has risen by 2°C since measurements began in the late 19th century, Austurfrétt reports. Five of the area’s warmest summers have been recorded after the turn of the century.

Higher temperatures, fewer snowy days

Last week, Kristín Björg Ólafsdóttir, a climatologist with Iceland’s MET Office, marked the 150th anniversary of continuous temperature measurements at Teigarhorn by giving a talk in Löngubúð in Djúpivogur.

As noted in her lecture, the Danish Meteorological Institute began conducting measurements in Djúpivogur in 1872 but measurements were moved to Teigarhorn in 1881. The average temperature in Teigarhorn has risen by 2°C over that time (meanwhile, Earth’s average global temperature has risen by 0.8°C since 1880).

Kristín also noted that three of the area’s warmest summers had recently passed, i.e. in 2014, 2016, and 2017. The coldest summers, on the other hand, occurred well over 100 years ago, in 1881, 1887, 1888, and 1892. Five of the area’s warmest summers have been recorded after the turn of the century.

As noted by Austurfrétt, Teigarhorn distinguishes itself from other places in Iceland as the site where the country’s hottest temperature was recorded: 30.5°C on June 22, 1939. (The original measurement was 30.3°C, but as the thermometer was later deemed 0.2°C too low, the measurement was revised).

Kristín also pointed out that the annual average number of “all-white” days (when the ground is covered by snow) in Teigarhorn only amounted to 18, i.e. just over two weeks.

Austurfréttir reports that Teigarhorn was awarded Centennial Observing Station status from the World Meteorological Organisation for over 100 years of continuous meteorological measurements. This is the second weather station in Iceland to be awarded the status (the first was in Stykkishólmur).

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