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Teenagers Caught Vaping Synthetic Cannabinoid Spice

A group of teenagers in Reykjavík were caught vaping the synthetic cannabinoid Spice (a range of laboratory-made chemicals that mimic the effects of THC, the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis).

According to a statement released yesterday by the police in Reykjavík, the teenagers were stopped on account of questionable behaviour. The police subsequently confiscated the teenagers’ e-cigarettes and sent e-liquids to the University of Iceland Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology for analysis. The analysis revealed that the e-liquid contained the drug Spice, as well as nicotine. The Government Agency for Child Protection is currently collaborating with police authorities on the case.

As noted by police authorities, the find is a cause for worry:

“The police in the Greater Reykjavík Area would like to raise awareness and to encourage parents and legal guardians to be on their guard. Among the short-term effects of Spice – which is almost odourless – are feelings of joy and euphoria; however, increased heart rate, elevated blood pressure, hallucinations, paranoia, anxiety attacks, and aggression are among the drug’s more serious side effects.“

This summer, nine teenagers in the Greater Manchester area collapsed from unwittingly vaping an e-liquid containing Spice. In an interview with Sky News, drug expert Michael Linnell stated that the risk of vaping spice was far more dangerous than from a natural cannabis product.

“It is difficult for even experienced spice users to judge dosage and unintentionally administering a toxic dose is common … severe poisoning is far more common with synthetic cannabinoids than with cannabis, and in some cases, the poisoning may even be fatal.”

Teenagers Caught Vaping Synthetic Cannabinoid Spice

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