Strikes Continue, Wide-Reaching Effects Expected Skip to content

Strikes Continue, Wide-Reaching Effects Expected

Strikes among members of the Association of Academics (BHM) recommenced at midnight last night. Around 100 members have gone on strike until further notice, including veterinarians, natural scientists and nutritionists at the Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority (MAST), ruv.is reports.

The impact of the wage dispute has the potential to have wide-reaching effects.

With vets going on strike a large part of the import and export of animal products is on hold. The slaughter of chickens and pigs will also be interrupted, and as a result, there is expected to be a shortage of meat on the Icelandic market starting this week.

Bills of health for seafood exports to Russia, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Israel will also not be issued during the strike. Fisheries exports to Russia generated ISK 1 billion (USD 7.3 million; EUR 6.8 million) per month in 2012.

Staff at the Financial Management Authority (FJS) are on strike for three weeks. As a result, the payment of child support payments of over ISK 50,000 may be delayed. An exemption has been applied for.

Healthcare services are also affected with a large number of operations postponed. Operations and image analysis of newly diagnosed cancer patients at the Landspítali National University Hospital will also be postponed. The strike among staff at the hospital has been ongoing for two weeks.

Representatives of BHM and the state will meet at the State Negotiator today.

Meanwhile, a vote among members of the Federation of General and Special Workers in Iceland (SGS) on whether or not to participate in strikes closes at midnight tonight. If members vote in favor, strikes will begin in late April and continue in May.

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