Opioid Crisis: Over 1,730 Doses of Naloxone Distributed Skip to content
Photo: Golli.

Opioid Crisis: Over 1,730 Doses of Naloxone Distributed

A procedural change to the delivery of naloxone, a medication used to reverse or reduce the effects of opioids, has greatly increased its distribution; over 1,730 doses of naloxone nasal spray have been distributed to companies and organisations assisting individuals struggling with opioid addiction since the new procedure was implemented last year.

“Life-saving” medicine

As noted in a press release on the government’s website, a life-saving nasal spray containing naloxone is now more accessible nationwide as a first response to opioid overdoses. The revised delivery arrangement allows individuals to obtain the medicine at no cost. Opioid-containing substances, such as heroin, methadone, fentanyl, oxycodone, buprenorphine, and morphine, are examples of drugs where naloxone can be administered.

As noted by the press release, naloxone previously required a prescription directly from a doctor to the patient. Following a modification to the procedure last year, doctors have been allowed to prescribe the drug to companies or organisations assisting individuals struggling with opioid addiction and/or their relatives.

Furthermore, the Ministry of Health has covered all costs of the drug through a tender by the National University Hospital (Landspítali), responsible for inventory and distribution. Various entities, including health institutions, police departments, homeless shelters, the Icelandic Red Cross, and Reykjavík City’s Welfare Division, have benefitted from this arrangement. “Over 1,730 doses of naloxone nasal spray have been distributed to these parties since the new procedure was implemented.”

The press release further notes that to combat the growing problem of opioid overuse, the government recently announced that it had approved Minister of Health Willum Þórs Þórsson’s proposals, including an increased budget for expanded distribution of naloxone nasal spray.

“Following successful examples from other countries, the Ministry of Health aims to replicate their success in reducing opioid overdose deaths. Emergency responders and service providers assisting individuals with opioid addiction are encouraged to keep emergency doses of naloxone on hand for immediate treatment while emphasising the importance of seeking medical care afterwards for further treatment.”

Sign up for our weekly newsletter

Get news from Iceland, photos, and in-depth stories delivered to your inbox every week!

Subscribe to Iceland Review

In-depth stories and high-quality photography showcasing life in Iceland!

Share article

Facebook
Twitter

Recommended Posts