Nineteen Fatal Accidents in Iceland in 2011 Skip to content

Nineteen Fatal Accidents in Iceland in 2011

In 2011, 19 people died in accidents in Iceland as stated in an overview issued by ICE-SAR, the umbrella organization for search and rescue. The majority of these fatalities, 12, were traffic accidents.

fatalaccidents2002-2011_ice-sar

The graph shows the number of individuals who died in accidents in Iceland from 2002 to 2011. Image courtesy of ICE-SAR.

Fatal accidents at home or during recreational activities were two in 2011, a significant decrease from the previous year when they numbered eight, a press release states.

Two persons died at work-related accidents, one at sea, another by drowning and one accident falls into the category “other”.

There were no fatal accidents among fishermen last year. This is the second time in Icelandic history that there were no fatal accidents in the industry; the last time this occurred was in 2008.

According to ICE-SAR, fishermen have become much more aware of how to maintain their safety and the Accident Prevention School for Fishermen has proven its importance.

Overall, accidental fatalities have been in constant decline in the past decade. For example, in 2002, 42 persons died in accidents in Iceland and 29 in 2007.

As in past years, men were in the majority of those whose lives were lost in accidents in 2011, 13, compared to two women and four children younger than 14.

The representatives of ICE-SAR are pleased with the downward trend in fatal accidents in Iceland, which is attributed to efficient accident prevention work carried out by ICE-SAR and other organizations and institutions around the country.

They would also like to express their condolences to those whose loved ones have died in accidents.

ESA

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