Most Iceland Theater Awards Go to Tengdó Skip to content

Most Iceland Theater Awards Go to Tengdó

A number of plays were recognized at the tenth annual Gríman, the Icelandic Theater Awards, which took place at a celebratory ceremony in Silfurberg, one of Harpa’s music halls, yesterday evening. The piece Tengdó received the most awards.

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Valur in his role in Tengdó. From the website of Reykjavík City Theater.

Tengdó, staged by CommonNonsense at Reykjavík City Theater, was named Play of the Year, Valur Freyr Einarsson Playwright and Actor of the Year and Davíð Þór Jónsson was awarded for his articulation in the play, Morgunblaðið reports.

In Tengdó, directed by Jón Páll Eyjólfsson, Valur tells the story of his mother-in-law, whose father was an African-American soldier based in Iceland, and what it was like growing up not knowing her father and looking different from everyone else.

Valur himself plays the part of his mother-in-law and that of her mother. The jury concluded that, “the play strikes a cord that we unfortunately too seldom get to witness in the Icelandic theater. The cord is pure and true because it is based on actual experience and told in a fascinating narrative where everyone party to the story are included.”

Afmælisveislan, staged by the National Theater of Iceland, received three awards: Guðjón Pedersen was named Director of the Year, Kristbjörg Kjeld Supporting Actress of the Year and Björn Thors Supporting Actor of the Year.

Supporting Actress of the Year was Ólafía Hrönn Jónsdóttir for her part in the National Theater’s Heimsljós.

The best children’s play was determined to be Skrímslið litla systir mín, staged by 10 fingur. Among those accepting the award was nine-year-old Úlfur Elíasson, who had the basic idea for the play.

ESA

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