Local Baby Food Hits Icelandic Market Skip to content

Local Baby Food Hits Icelandic Market

Three jobs have been created in Gardur after the baby food producer Barnavagninn launched operations there recently. The town has approximately 1,500 inhabitants and is located in the employment-starved Sudurnes region in southwest Iceland.

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Mothers and babies taking a stroll. Photo by Bernhild Vögel.

The company is run by the same people who are behind Ávaxtabíllinn, which delivers fresh fruits to businesses in the capital region, among other services.

“The area has been rather hard hit by unemployment so we thought it would be positive to launch the production there,” managing director of Barnavagninn Haukur Magnússon told visir.is.

Barnavagninn produces six types of puree for children made from fruits and vegetables: carrot, yellow turnip, apple and prune puree along with two types of mixed purees. The vegetables are grown in Iceland but the fruits are imported.

Magnússon said a lot of development work has been invested in the products. Emphasis is placed on the nutritional value of the purees and no unnecessary preservatives are used; apart from a few of the purees containing malic acid, they are pure.

This is the first time that fresh and local unfrozen purees for children have entered the Icelandic market; parents who until now have resorted to jarred baby foods from foreign producers are provided with an alternative.

Barnavagninn is owned by Magnússon and his family, while Eignarhaldsfélag Sudurnesja, which is involved in increasing employment opportunities in the area, is a shareholder.

There seems to be some growth in the local baby food market; around New Year’s Kátir kroppar placed frozen vegetable purees for children on the market—the first of its kind in Iceland.

Kátir kroppar produces four types of baby food, which is available in Fjardarkaup, Melabúdin, Fjallkonubakaríid and Hamborgarafabrikkan.

Baby food from Barnavagninn is available in the stores of Hagkaup, Bónus, Krónan and Nóatún.

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