Icelandic Actor a Shooting Star Skip to content

Icelandic Actor a Shooting Star

Icelandic Hilmar Guðjónsson* is among ten actors who were selected for SHOOTING STARS 2012 – Europe’s Best Young actors, as announced on Thursday. Hilmar plays one of the leads in the popular comedy Either Way (Á annan veg; 2011).

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Hilmar Guðjónsson. Source: shooting-stars.eu.

“With their outstanding work in feature films they have proven themselves ready to expand their film careers beyond their home countries to the world’s screens. From February 11 to 13, European Film Promotion (EFP) will showcase these newcomers from around Europe at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival, running February 9-19, 2012,” as it says on shooting-stars.eu.

The jury’s comment about Hilmar:

“A compelling and wonderful actor with a strong, tangible style even playing the seemingly weak, foolish boy at the heart of Either Way. With his versatility and ability to stand out, Hilmar Guðjónsson has a promising career ahead.”

A former football player, 27-year-old Hilmar was hired by Reykjavík City Theatre upon graduating as an actor in spring 2010 and he has since appeared in four plays there, ranging from Shakespeare to Ray Cooney.

He had already entered the film industry in 2006 by playing a supporting role in Clint Eastwood’s Flags of Our Fathers, followed by another small role in Ragnar Bragason’s Mr. Bjarnfreðarson in 2009.

He was cast in his first lead in Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson’s Either Way this year, which recently took the top prize at the 29th Turin Film Festival in Italy.

In 2012, Hilmar is set to have a supporting role in Óskar Þór Axelsson’s feature film Black’s Game, based on a thriller by Stefán Máni.

Click here to read more about Either Way.

PS

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