Hundreds Protest Icesave Deal in Iceland Skip to content

Hundreds Protest Icesave Deal in Iceland

As many as 900 people assembled on Austurvöllur parliamentary square in Reykjavík yesterday to protest the agreement among Icelandic, Dutch and British authorities on Iceland’s obligation towards Landsbanki’s Icesave depositors.

From the protests on Austurvöllur in November 2008. Yesterday’s demonstration reminded many of the series of protests that took place after the economic collapse last fall. Copyright: Icelandic Photo Agency.

The demonstration began calmly at 3 pm, but then the number of protestors gradually increased and the demonstration grew louder, ruv.is reports.

While the agreement was being discussed at Althingi, protestors banged pots and pans together, clapped their hands and rattled their key chains to make noise.

Others were carrying signs. Some read “Iceslave” while others stated that the interest rates of the Icesave loans equal the annual export value of 200,000 tons of cod.

Some demonstrators addressed President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, reminding him of his veto right: “Are you signing this, Ólafur?” their signs asked.

The demonstration was mostly peaceful, but police arrested five protestors when they didn’t comply with demands to stop banging on the walls and windows of the parliamentary building, mbl.is reports.

Later in the evening, around 9 pm, a group of protestors barged into the building at Fríkirkjuvegur 11, which is owned by Novator, a company in the ownership of one of Iceland’s tycoons, Björgólfur Thor Björgólfsson, Fréttabladid reports.

According to police, the people entered the house through an unlocked door and didn’t cause any damage to it. Most people had vacated the house one hour later.

Click here to read more about the Icesave agreement.

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