Farmers’ Markets Increasingly Popular in Iceland Skip to content

Farmers’ Markets Increasingly Popular in Iceland

Farmers’ markets have been popular among both tourists and locals in foreign countries for years, but they are new to Iceland’s countryside. Such markets were first held in Iceland a few years ago and are constantly growing in popularity.

The best known farmers’ market in Iceland is the market in Mosskógar in Mosfellsdalur valley, outside Mosfellsbaer in southwest Iceland, which is frequented by people from the region as well as residents of Reykjavík and neighboring towns, 24 Stundir reports.

“We have home-made products, jams and pesto and trout from Thingvallavatn lake. The food is from the neighborhood or the countryside surrounding Thingvellir [national park],” said managing director of the Mosskógar market Jón Jóhannsson.

Once in a while concerts are held to entertain market goers and other special events are organized, especially in August which is the market’s high season. “Then we always have a jam contest here, which is a lot of fun,” Jóhannsson said.

Other countryside markets are held in the vicinity of the capital region. On Saturday a market will be held in the Félagsgardur community center in Kjós, also not far from Mosfellsbaer, where local farmers will offer their products for sale.

Market organizer Steinunn Hilmarsdóttir said products on offer include beef, straight from the farm, trout and other types of fish, cow beestings and other dairy products. “Then people will sell their handicraft, like products made from fish skin, wool and silk, knitwear, embroidered cloths like towels, clothing and more.”

Hilmarsdóttir said the market is very valuable for the local community in Kjós. “Last year the people who sold their products on the market were very pleased to receive happy visitors who were keen to find out what was happening here in the countryside.”

“Such market days bring people more closely together because it is a joint initiative which is based on cooperation between residents,” Hilmarsdóttir concluded.

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