Eurostat: House Prices Risen Most Sharply in Iceland Since 2010 Skip to content
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Eurostat: House Prices Risen Most Sharply in Iceland Since 2010

According to a new report by Eurostat, house prices have risen most sharply in Iceland over the past decade when compared to other European countries. Between 2010 and the first quarter of 2021, house prices in Iceland increased by ca. 140% and the cost of rent rose by almost 70%.

Estonia the only country that compares

Yesterday, Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union, released a new report on the prices of homes and the cost of rent within the EU (and among members of EFTA). The report indicates that house prices have risen most sharply in Iceland compared to other European countries, or approximately 140% between 2010 and the first quarter of 2021. The cost of rent in Iceland has risen by almost 70% over the same period. Compare this to the building-cost index, which has increased by approximately 57% since 2010. The consume-price index has remained relatively stable.

The only other European country that has seen a similar increase in the prices of homes is Estonia, where cost has risen by approximately 130%. In Sweden and Norway, house prices have increased by 80% compared to ca. 50% in Denmark. The average rise in house prices over the past decade in Europe is approximately 35%. Only four countries have seen homes decrease in value over the past decade: Greece, Italy, Spain, and Cyprus.

The cost of rent has generally seen a more minor increase in Europe over the past decade, when compared to house prices, or approximately 15%. In a few countries, however, rent has risen faster than the cost of homes, e.g. in Finland, Ireland, and Lithuania. In Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, the increase in the cost of rent is much lower than in Iceland, or approximately 20%.

Interest rates raised and mortgage regulations tightened

Iceland Review reported on Wednesday that the Central Bank had raised key interest rates by 0.25%, bringing the rate to 1.5%. This change marked the Bank’s third interest rate hike since May, indicating a shift in direction as the economic forecast has improved.

Throughout last year, the bank’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) consistently lowered interest rates in response to the pandemic recession but now says it expects the domestic economic recovery to continue. The Central Bank’s key interest rate reached a historic low of 0.75% in November last year. In comparison, rates in January 2020 stood at 3% and in January 2019 at 4.5%.

The Central Bank also tightened mortgage regulations at the end of September, stating that rising real estate prices had “gone hand-in-hand with increased household debt.” The move, which entails instituting a maximum debt-to-service ratio of 35% for borrowers (40% for first-time buyers) is intended to support stability in the housing market.

May put some families in a “tight spot”

As reported this summer, this increase in key interest rates will likely have the most significant impact on those who signed non-indexed mortgages with variable interest rates. A report from Landsbankinn this summer demonstrated a 1% increase in variable interest rates for a non-indexed mortgage of ISK 30 million could result in an ISK 25,000 rise in monthly payments.

Read more about Iceland’s housing market below:

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