Eruption Cycle Near Grindavík Could End Soon Skip to content
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Photo: Ísak Finnbogason/Facebook. The biggest crater.

Eruption Cycle Near Grindavík Could End Soon

The current volcanic eruption in Sundhnúkagígar could mark the end of a string of eruptions in the area near Grindavík, despite now being in its third week and still chugging along.

The eruption began on March 16 and activity remains in two craters in the area, with steady lava flow and no immediate signs of the eruption ending, according to an Mbl.is report. More of the activity is ongoing in the larger of the two craters. Some gas pollution could be detected in Grindavík and Hafnir today.

Magma flowing from deep

However, there are signs that this might be the final eruption in the cycle of volcanic activity which began at the end of last year. Þor­vald­ur Þórðar­son, professor of volcanology at the University of Iceland, told Mbl.is this weekend that activity in Sundhnúkagígar might be coming to a close.

The shallower magma chamber in the area, situated under Svartsengi near the tourist destination Blue Lagoon, which has been closed since the current eruption started, is no longer receiving magma from the eruption, Þorvaldur explains. Therefore, magma from the deeper magma chamber in the area is flowing to the surface. “This could chug on for the next few days,” he said Saturday. “We’re not talking about the eruption ending in the next few hours.”

Activity elsewhere still possible

“I believe that when this eruption stops the activity in Sundhnúkagígar will end,” Þorvaldur added. “That doesn’t mean, however, that there won’t be activity elsewhere. Since this is coming from the deeper magma chamber and crustal uplift has stopped, the process we’ve seen since November 10 is ending. In my estimation, this activity has been connected to magma flowing from the deeper chamber to the shallower one.”

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