Charges to Be Brought Against Domestic-Terror Plot Suspects Skip to content
Weapons and ammunition
Photo: Golli.

Charges to Be Brought Against Domestic-Terror Plot Suspects

The District Prosecutor will push for continued custody over two men suspected of planning a domestic terror attack earlier this year. Formal charges are expected to be brought against the men at the District Court of Reykjavík today.

Up to six years in prison

Four Icelandic men were arrested on September 21 suspected of “terrorist plots” against state institutions and civilians. Two of the suspects were immediately released; the other two have remained in custody.

Speaking to RÚV today, district attorney Karl Ingi Vilbergsson stated that the District Prosecutor has decided to charge the two suspects for violating Article No. 100 of Iceland’s General Penal Code. The charges are expected to be introduced when prosecutors motion for extended custody over the two men at the District Court of Reykjavík today. RÚV notes that this is likely the first time that such a charge is brought in Iceland.

In an interview with Mbl.is, however, Karl Ingi stated that the District Prosecutor had “never considered” charging the suspects on the basis of Article No. 100 of Iceland’s General Penal Code. He was not willing to offer further detail on the content of the charges at this time.

As previously noted, the two suspects arrested in September had hoarded numerous weapons – including dozens of semi-automatic guns and 3D-printed components – alongside a considerable amount of ammunition. The men, both of whom are in their twenties, had also discussed carrying out attacks against various political figures, among them Minister Guðlaugur Þór Þórðarson and Chairman of Efling, Sólveig Anna Jónsdóttir.

Article 100 of Iceland’s Penal Code: [Art. 100 a [Punishment of up to lifelong imprisonment shall be imposed on any person committing one or more of the following acts of terrorism with the intention of causing the public serious fear or unlawfully compelling the Icelandic or foreign authorities, or international institutions, to take action or refrain from taking action with a view to weakening or damaging the constitutional structure or the political, economic or social basis of the state or international institution:]1)

Article 20 of the General Penal Code states that for “an attempted offence, a more lenient punishment may be imposed than for a completed offence.”

This article will be updated.

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