Archeological Project Featured in National Museum Skip to content

Archeological Project Featured in National Museum

An excavation project has been ongoing in Kolkuós in Skagafjördur, north Iceland, since 2003. Kolkuós is the ancient harbor of the Skagafjördur region and is considered to be the main reason for the region’s center of power having been established at the bishopric at Hólar.

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Objects from the excavation on display as part of the exhibition ‘Endurfundir’ at the National Museum of Iceland.

At the exhibition ‘Endurfundir’ (‘Reunion’), which is currently running at the National Museum in Reykjavík, objects unearthed during the excavation project can be observed. The Kolkuós excavation is part of a larger archeological project around Hólar.

Kolkuós was a methodically-planned area with a number of booths that were connected by a street extending the entire length of the spit of land. The harborage was favorable and clear evidence of a lively inter-country trade, both with basic goods and luxury products, has been found at the location.

The harbor was used from the settlement in the 9th century AD until the 16th century—its advantages seem to have been compromised with time while the bishop of Hólar gradually lost his secular power.

Because of erosion by the sea there is little soil left on the spit of land but archeologists have achieved remarkable success in their competition with the natural elements.

A new website about the project has been launched. It’s in Icelandic but pictures (myndir) from the excavation can be observed.

On Tuesday, October 19, Ragnheidur Traustadóttir, archeologist and leader of the Hólar and Kolkuós excavations, will give a presentation on the project at the National Museum of Iceland at 12:05 pm. Everyone is welcome but the presentation will be in Icelandic.

Click here to read more about Kolkuós.

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