Reykjanes Earthquakes: Uncertainty Phase Declared Skip to content
Photo: Golli. Selatangar, Reykjanes.

Reykjanes Earthquakes: Uncertainty Phase Declared

The Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management has declared a phase of uncertainty due to the ongoing earthquake swarm on the Reykjanes peninsula in Southwest Iceland. Six earthquakes over M3 were detected on the peninsula yesterday, with the strongest measuring M4.7. Specialists say earthquakes and uplift in the area are likely signs of magma collecting below the surface. There are no signs an eruption is imminent.

Likely magma is gathering below surface

“We have seen, since before the weekend, indications that expansion and uplift are occurring by Svartsengi similar to what happened in 2020,” Met Office Earthquake Hazards Coordinator Kristín Jónsdóttir told RÚV. “That is we think it is quite likely that we are seeing the beginning of magma collecting below the surface at Svartsengi and it’s of course not unthinkable that could end in an eruption, but it is still much too early to say.”

The 2020 activity Kristín is referring to was a period of uplift (land rise) by Þorbjörn mountain on the Reykjanes peninsula. The uplift ended without an eruption ever occurring. An eruption did occur on the peninsula last year, however, as many readers know, and it was preceded by weeks of powerful earthquakes felt across Southwest Iceland. Volcanologist Þorvaldur Þórðarson has stated there is a 50% chance of another eruption on Reykjanes this year.

Falling objects and landslides

Travellers and hikers on the Reykjanes peninsula are warned to stay away from steep inclines, where earthquakes can cause landslides or rockfall. The Civil Protection Department encourages residents in or near the active are to secure loose objects in their homes that could fall in the event of an earthquake, particularly those that could fall on individuals while they are sleeping. The Civil Protection Department website features earthquake preparedness information in English.

Read more about the geology of the Reykjanes peninsula.

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