Olympian in “Race Against Time” Even Before Race Day

Icelandic skier Sturla Snær Snorrason is in the midst of a nail-biting race—but not the kind he was hoping to take part in during the Winter 2022 Olympics in Beijing, China. Vísir reports that Olympian was just released from isolation after having been diagnosed with COVID last Saturday. This means that Sturla Snær can begin training again but will not be able to actually compete unless he receives a negative PCR test result prior to his events, one of which is this weekend.

See Also: Five Icelanders Compete in 2022 Winter Olympics

Sturla, who competed in the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, was one of Iceland’s flagbearers during the opening ceremonies last Friday, along with cross-country skier Kristrún Guðnadóttir. Following the ceremony, he began to experience COVID symptoms and was taken to a hospital in Beijing and put in isolation.

After a few days, Sturla began to feel better, but he also began to get bored. “There was no coffee or anything like that,” he remarked in an interview. “It wasn’t possible to go on any social media that we use at home. […] There wasn’t even a table and chair to sit at. You had to eat in bed and lie there all day. Not much in the way of entertainment, so I had to make my own.” To while away the time, therefore, Sturla decided to create a website for the road-marking company he runs with his father.

As of Friday, Sturla was still in quarantine and still testing positive for COVID. If all goes well, however, he will compete in Men’s Giant Slalom late Sunday night/early Monday morning (GMT/Iceland time) this weekend and Men’s Slalom in the early hours of February 16.

 

Moldovan Choir Steals Show at Men’s Football Game

The Icelandic men’s football team played their final match at the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifiers yesterday evening. Among the evening’s highlights was the performance of Iceland’s national anthem, Löfsöngur, by a Moldovan choir.

The Icelandic men’s football team competed against Moldova at the Zimbru Stadium in Chișinău, Moldova, yesterday. Iceland beat Moldova 2-1 with goals from captain Gylfi Sigurðsson and Birkir Bjarnason (Nicolae Milinceanu scored Moldova’s only goal). Despite winning the match, Iceland failed to directly qualify for the Euro 2020 Championship. Iceland placed third in Group H with 19 points (Iceland can still qualify through play-offs in March).

Prior to the match, a choir comprised of approximately 30 women, dressed in white robes, sang the Icelandic national anthem, Löfsöngur (see below). As a journalist for Vísir insinuated, the performance was a pleasant contrast to the boos of Turkish supporters during Iceland’s penultimate match in Turkey last Thursday.

How can I buy a cheap second-hand car in Iceland?

Q: Does buying a car require much in the way of paperwork/getting it registered/examined by a mechanic?

I plan on buying one and selling it when I leave (a month or so later), as that’ll be way cheaper than hiring one.

But will this require a huge amount of time and money? Also, is there a good site for browsing for used cars?

Caspian, Western Australia

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A: At the Hekla dealership in Reykjavík, I was told that it will hardly be worth the time and money to buy a used car for such a short period of time. Very few of the used cars they sell cost less than ISK 1 million (USD 7,800, EUR 5,800).

In addition to the price of the car, you have to pay insurances and an automobile tax. It is also questionable that you would be able to sell it again before you leave. With all the used cars currently on the market, that could take time.

If you buy a car in Iceland to use it here, but not just take it out of the country, you have to have a kennitala, an Icelandic ID number, which I believe is only issued to those who live in the country. You can contact the National Registry if you want to check whether there are any exceptions.

If you want to take a look at the used cars currently available at Hekla, they are listed on this website. It is in Icelandic but the information is pretty standard: tegund means “model,” ár refers to the year the car was made, ekinn states how far the car has been driven in kilometers, verð means “price” and tilboðsverð “discount price.” If you click on the make of the car you can see a picture of it.

But the website bilasolur.is is probably the best place to look. It has information about sales agencies and available cars in English. You should contact difference agencies and compare terms and prices.