Whales of Iceland: Which whales can you find around Iceland?

Whales of Iceland

Iceland is a fantastic place to observe whales. Due to its prime location in the North Atlantic Ocean, many whales migrate to Icelandic waters to feed during the warmer summer months. More than 20 whale species call the Icelandic waters their home. Venturing out on one of the many whale-watching tours is usually one of the easiest ways to spot the cetaceans, but some lucky devils might also catch a glimpse of a whale from Iceland’s shores! 

If you’re interested in finding the best whale-watching tours in Iceland, make sure also to check out our whale-watching guide and find the best spots to observe these large ocean mammals!

Here’s a guide to all the whale species around Iceland and their favourite spots.

Whales of Iceland

Whale species in Iceland

Whales are warm-blooded mammals which nurse their offspring and need to come up to the surface to breathe air. Interestingly enough, all whales have hair in some way or another. Most whales have their hair follicles, whereas land mammals have their whiskers today. Humpback whales, for instance, have bumps on their head, each containing a follicle with a single hair! The existence of hair might be a remnant of their land-mammal ancestors. Whales and cows (and other hoofed animals) actually share a common ancestor about 50 million years ago!

Whales belong to the cetacea category, also including dolphins and porpoises. Whale species can generally be distinguished into toothed and baleen whales. While baleen whales, like blue whales and humpback whales, have – well – baleens to filter their food, toothed whales like orcas (also commonly known as “killer whales”), beluga whales and pilot whales use their teeth to hunt and eat larger prey items.

Due to their proximity to the Arctic, Icelandic waters are rich in nutrients, such as krill, small fish, and other small crustaceans. That is why many whales spend their summers in colder waters off the shores of Iceland, Canada and Greenland. They stay in these waters for 4 to 6 months, eating and bulking up in blubber as a food reserve for the winter months when they migrate back to tropical areas for breeding and calving season, where food is scarce.

Whales of Iceland
Whale-Watching in Faxaflói, Reykjavík (credit: Golli)

Baleen whales around Iceland

Baleen whales are among the biggest species on our planet and are generally larger than toothed whales. In contrast to toothed whales, they have two blowholes on the top of their head, whereas toothed whales only have one. With their baleen plates, they mostly feed on plankton, especially krill, which are tiny crustaceans that can be found in all the world’s oceans. Baleen whales also have wide ranges and usually migrate thousands of kilometres to reach their destination. Generally, baleen whales tend to be slower than their toothed peers, with a few exceptions: one of them is the fin whale, also called the Greyhound of the sea.

Blue whale
Blue Whale
Swimming blue whale (credit: NOAA)

Famously known as the biggest animal that has ever lived, the blue whale also visits Iceland during summer. Female animals can reach a length of up to 32 metres (104 ft), while their male counterparts reach about 27 metres (88 ft). In Iceland, we have the northern blue whale, mostly found in the north of Iceland. Húsavík is the whale-watching capital of Iceland, and even though it is quite rare, there have been sightings of blue whales nearly every year! 

In a single mouthful of water, a blue whale can engulf over 100 tonnes of water and eat up between 10 and 22 tonnes of krill per day (22,000-48,000 pounds). As blue whales produce very tall blows (about 10m/32ft), they are easily spotted. Usually, they can dive for more than 30 minutes, making it quite possible to observe one on a whale-watching tour! “Icelandic” blue whales usually migrate here from places like the Azores and the northwest coast of Africa, though not all migration routes are known.

During the peak of commercial whaling, thousands of animals were killed, leading to repercussions in blue whale populations today. The species is on the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red Endangered Species list. In Iceland, blue whales have been protected from whaling since 1960.

Fin whale
hvalur whaling in iceland
Dead fin whale at the whaling station on Hvalfjörður (credit: Golli)

Fin whales are the second largest animal on earth after blue whales. In contrast to their blue whale peers, they are also called the greyhounds of the sea, as they can reach a very fast speed (for their size) of a maximum of 47 km/h (15mi/h) in small outbursts. Females can reach a length of about 18-20 metres (65ft). Fin whales tend to favour offshore waters between Iceland and Greenland as their summer feeding grounds and are usually quite far out – further than whale-watching observation grounds. As blue whales and fin whales share their feeding areas within Icelandic water, there are cases where the two species have produced offspring together, so-called hybrids.

The worldwide population of fin whales is considered vulnerable, with about 40,000 individuals in the entire North Atlantic. Unfortunately, Iceland is still one of the only countries to commercially whale – and the only nation left that hunts fin whales. After a short hiatus, whaling in Iceland resumed in the last few years, killing hundreds of fin whales and small numbers of hybrid whales for meat export to Japan. If you’re interested in reading more about whale hunting in Iceland, you can check out our recent feature article here and listen to our Deep North podcast episode here.

Humpback whale
Whales of Iceland
Humpback whale munching on some food in Faxaflói, Reykjavík (credit: Golli)

Humpback whales are one of the kinds that are most commonly observed from the shores or on whale-watching tours in Iceland. Female humpbacks reach an average length of about 15 metres (50ft), while males are up to 14 metres in size. Due to their agility, they often breach, making it easy to spot them! In the summer of 2019, humpbacks were seen on 28 out of 31 days from whale watching tours in Reykjavík!

Usually, humpback whales like to stay in solitude but occasionally stay in small groups and pairs. Interestingly enough, they have various hunting techniques, like bubble-net feeding, where they swim beneath a school of fish and release air bubbles, which trap the fish in the bubble net, making it easy and clever for them to catch their prey!

Minke whale
Minke whale Iceland
Minke whale swimming about (credit: Wikimedia Commons/Waielbi)

While the previous baleen whales have all been massive in size, the minke whale is the smallest species of baleen whales found around Iceland. The North Atlantic minke whale is dark grey with a white belly and distinctive white bands on their pectoral fins. 

They usually surface quite often before venturing on a deeper dive that lasts approximately 20 minutes. They are, therefore, quite commonly spotted from whale watching boatsMinke whales are the most common whales in the coastal Icelandic waters, with approximately 13,000 individuals. Iceland stopped hunting the species in 2019.

Sei whale
A sei whale mother and her calf (credit: Christin Khan, NOAA)

Sei whales are the third-largest baleen whales. Just like fin whales, they are very fast and prefer offshore waters. They are, therefore, not very likely to be spotted either from land or on a whale-watching tour. According to observations, there are about 10,000 individuals in the North Atlantic, with the most animals between Iceland and Greenland. During the height of modern whaling in the 20th century, the population of sei whales also decreased drastically after stocks of prior “popular” hunted whales were nearly depleted. Since the late 70s, the population size has slowly been recovering.

Grey whale
A grey whale breaching in Alaska (credit: Merrill Gosho, NOAA)

These large species can reach a maximum length of about 15 metres (50ft) and cannot be found in the North Atlantic, and therefore Iceland, anymore. You might wonder why they are then mentioned on the list of whales around Iceland. Well, a long time ago, grey whales were abundant around Europe. However, due to extensive whaling dating back as early as AD 500, the species was driven to extinction in that region. In Iceland, grey whales have been wiped out since the early 1700s. Nowadays, grey whales can only be found in the Pacific Ocean.

Toothed whales around Iceland

Toothed whales generally feed on fish and squid. They utilise their teeth for capturing and tearing their prey into smaller pieces, but they don’t chew them as we humans would. Most toothed whales use echolocation to communicate and hunt.

Orca / Killer whale
Orca, Whales of Iceland
An orca in the wild (credit: Felix Rottmann)

This apex predator can kill great white sharks without trouble and is also part of Iceland’s flourishing ocean wildlife! Orcas are highly intelligent, and they usually hunt in groups. They have quite a diverse diet, eating everything from fish, and sharks, to seals and other whales. The best place to see orcas in Iceland is on the Snæfellsnes peninsula with Láki tours from Ólafsvík. If herring is in the fjord, orcas can also often be spotted in the winter months – but the best time for observing them is from March until June. Check out orca whale-watching tours here

Pilot whale
Pilot whales
Pilot whale pod (credit: Bill Thompson/USFWS)

Long-finned pilot whales can be found in the North Atlantic and the Southern Hemisphere. The animals are very sociable, forming large groups of 20 to 150 individuals, but the pods can reach up to thousands of individuals. They form very strong bonds within their matrilineal group, with other adult animals often “babysitting” calves, even when they’re not closely related. 

Pilot whales frequently beach themselves, and often, the whole pod follows one leading animal, leading to hundreds dying. In 2019, around 50 pilot whales beached on the Snæfellsness peninsula, which was Iceland’s second-largest mass stranding of the past 40 years. It is not too usual to see pilot whales on whale-watching tours, but with some luck, you could definitely catch sight of a pod offshore the Snæfellsness peninsula!

Beluga whale
Beluga whales Little White & Little Grey take their first swim in their Beluga Whale Sanctuary home in Iceland
Little White & Little Grey in Klettsvík bay on Heimaey (credit: Sea Life Trust)

The “Canaries of the Sea” – as the species is often called due to their high vocality and use of various songs, clicks and whistles. Belugas have a distinct melon-shaped head with the melon – as it’s called – consisting of oil, which helps echolocation. Their vertebrae in the neck are not fused, so they can turn their heads without moving their white bodies, making their movement seem quite human-like. 

Belugas are not commonly seen in Iceland, but two rescued beluga whales are in the Sea Life sanctuary on Heimaey in the Westman Islands. Little White and Little Grey were rescued from an aquarium in Shanghai, and it is planned for them to move into a bay on the island for more freedom.

Narwhal
Narwhal Iceland
A narwhal and its great tusk near the Karl Alexander and Jackson Islands (northern part of the Franz Josef Land archipelago), June 2019 (credit: Wikimedia Commons, press service of Gazprom Neft PJSC)

Narwhals (Yes, they are spelled like that), also commonly referred to as the unicorns of the sea due to their unique ivory tusk, are excellent deep divers, reaching depths up to 800 metres (2,600ft). They travel in pods of about 20-30 animals. Their tusk grows out of their mouths into a spiral and possesses millions of nerve endings, helping them sense their surroundings. The tusk can reach a size of up to 3 metres (10ft). Interestingly enough, the tusk is the animals’ only tooth – so they swallow their prey whole! 

Generally, narwhal sightings in Iceland are pretty rare, with their natural habitat being in the Arctic waters of Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia. Rarely they can be spotted in the far north of Iceland. 

Sperm whale
Sperm whale Iceland
A sperm whale mother with her calf (credit: Gabriel Barathieu, Wikimedia Commons)

Sperm whales are the largest toothed whales, reaching lengths between 11-16 metres (36-50ft). The species regularly dives to depths of 500-1000 metres (1640-3280ft) and can remain underwater for up to 40 minutes. They are quite known for their strong echolocation clicks, which they use to search for prey and communicate with their peers. Their top prey are medium-large squid and fish, with some sperm whales even carrying battle scars with giant squid! Interestingly enough, sperm whales around Iceland tend to hunt bony fish rather than squid. 

They are not often observed around the shores of Iceland, as they spend very little time at the surface, but they can be found off Iceland’s west coast and occasionally in the north of Iceland in late spring and summer.

The Whales of Iceland Museum

If you want to see all the mentioned whales above and even more in life-size, we highly recommend checking out the Whales of Iceland museum in Reykjavík. You can learn more about these fantastic animals inhabiting Icelandic waters in their exhibition. It’s also a great choice, in case the weather should be bad and your whale-watching tour has been cancelled! The museum is located in Grandi, right by the ocean, next to the big supermarket chain Krónan. 

Check out their website here.

You can book a whale-watching tour here.

Is the Blue Lagoon in Iceland open after the eruption?

The Blue Lagoon Iceland

Yes, the Blue Lagoon is currently open after the volcanic eruption on February 8. Since January 9, there have been no visible signs within the eruptive fissures, meaning that the eruption has ceased for now. This is the third eruption within the last three months on the Reykjanes peninsula.

The Blue Lagoon has reopened on February 16.

Land uplift close to the lagoon

After intense seismic activity in the early morning of February 8, a volcanic eruption began on the Reykjanes peninsula in the Sýlingarfell mountain area. Shortly after, the Blue Lagoon closed and evacuated all of its operational units. The spa is in Zone 1 of the hazard map for volcanic eruption by the Icelandic Met Office. Currently, land uplift continues to increase under Svartsengi. The area is in close proximity to the Blue Lagoon. Experts are predicting another eruption to occur within the next few weeks, similar to the last three months.

Please make sure to stay updated and check the website of the facility and local news outlets before planning your visit. The situation can change very fast.

Useful resources

Apart from news updates that we provide, below are some links you may find useful as you stay apprised of the situation or your visit to Iceland nears:

The Icelandic Met Office, which provides updates on earthquake and volcano activity.

The Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration, which provides detailed updates on road conditions all over the country.

Safe Travel, which provides continuously updated information relevant to traveling to and within Iceland.

Isavia, which operates Keflavík International Airport.

Does Uber exist in Iceland?

Taxi in Iceland reykjavík

Simply, no. Uber – and also Lyft – do not exist in Iceland. But don’t worry, there are other ways to get around Reykjavík.

The Icelandic "Uber"

The closest thing to Uber in Iceland would be the relatively new taxi service by Hopp, mostly known for their electric scooters all over the capital area. Recently, Hopp also launched a new taxi service, where you can easily book a ride, get a detailed fare estimate, and track your taxi in real-time, just like with Uber or Lyft.

Taxis in Reykjavík

The most used and available option is the classic taxi service. There are several 24-hour taxi companies in Reykjavík, like Hreyfill, BSR, and Borgarbílastöðin. All taxis have official mileage meters and standard taxi fares. Please take into account that taxis can be quite pricey in Iceland. For instance, a taxi from the International Airport in Keflavík to Reykjavík (45min drive) can range from ISK 16,000-30,000 [€110-250 / $120-270]. There are special airport taxis available that offer special fares on those transfers.

The Stræto bus system

The cheapest way to get around Reykjavík and the suburbs is by bus. The bus company Stræto serves the capital area of Reykjavík and you can basically get around to most places. The fares range from ISK 315 for young people below 18 and seniors to ISK 630 for adults [€2,12-4,25 / $2,30-4,60].

To pay on the bus, you need to use the app Klappið on your phone – keep in mind that it sometimes has issues with foreign credit cards. You can also pay with cash on the bus. Make sure to give the exact amount, as the bus drivers can’t give any change. As of the moment, NFC solutions like Apple or Google Pay are not offered on the bus system. 

If you’re interested to read more about the public transport system in Iceland, check out our in-depth article here

A Different Story

Karitas Hrundar Palsdottir

It’s early Saturday morning and normally I would have slept through the few hours of scarce brightness that bless us this time of year. During winter, it is far too easy to hibernate through the gloominess of Iceland’s longest season. But this Saturday was different.  Let’s read and chat The sun was slowly creeping its […]

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Have all the sheep been rescued from Grindavík?

Sheep in Iceland
After it became clear that about 250 sheep were confined in Grindavík after the eruption on the Reykjanes peninsula began on Sunday, January 14, many people were concerned for the animals. On Tuesday, January 16, following two days without water and feed, all of the sheep were moved out of the town and are in safety now.

No immediate permit to rescue the animals

About 250 sheep were left behind when the eruption started. After the first evacuation of Grindavík in November following a series of earthquakes, all remaining animals were moved out of town. 

The fact that some livestock owners decided to return their animals to Grindavík in December caused public criticism, also from the Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority MAST. For some farmers, finding new shelter for their animals has been difficult. Sigrún Eggertsdóttir told the news outlet Vísir that she only found a temporary solution for her 30 sheep and did not have a choice but to bring the animals back to the town.

Initially, the animals left behind in a rushed evacuation just hours before the eruption were not designated a priority by officials. The Icelandic Animal Welfare Organisation started a campaign on social media, raising alarm after seeing that expensive machinery was moved out of Grindavík, but no permit for rescuing the sheep was issued. On January 16, officials finally allowed the livestock owners to enter the town and evacuate their sheep from the site of danger.

What will change in Iceland in 2024?

New Year's Eve Fireworks in Reykjavík, 2017.

A new year and a new beginning, so they say. 2024 comes with many changes to public price structures all over Iceland, a historic milestone in the population size and also some restructuring in leadership within the country. Here’s all you need to know about the upcoming changes in 2024 in Iceland.

Iceland’s population will reach 400,000 & election of new president

It is predicted that within the first six months of 2024, Iceland’s population will surpass 400,000 people. Currently, the population is only 1,000 people away from that mark. According to Statistics Iceland, the growth has been more rapid than expected as reaching a population of 400,000 was initially predicted in the year 2050.

Iceland’s president Guðni Th. Jóhannesson has announced that he will not run for president again, stepping down after two terms (8 years) in office. A new president will be elected in June. Currently, no one has announced their candidacy in the upcoming election.

The mayor of Reykjavík Dagur B. Eggertsson has also announced that he will step down from his position on January 16. He was Reykjavík’s mayor for the last ten years. Progressive Party Leader Einar Þorsteinsson will take over as mayor until the next election in 2026.

President Guðni Th. Jóhannesson

Pool prices and garbage disposal fees hike

Municipalities in Iceland have announced higher prices for trash collection, as a new system for sorting refuse is being implemented in the capital area. The biggest increase is in Reykjavík, where the price for two bins goes from ISK 52,600 [$389, €350] to ISK 73,500 [$544, €489]. The highest fee remains in the more affluent neighbouring municipality of Seltjarnarnes and amounts to ISK 75,000 [$555, €499]. From January 10, it also won’t be possible to collect disposable paper bags for the biodegradable trash free of charge from the supermarkets anymore. They can be picked up at the recycling centre Sorpa or the second-hand furniture store Góði hirðirinn instead and are still free of charge there.

In Reykjavík, the prices for trips to the swimming pool, museum tickets and petting zoo admissions in Laugardalur have also gone up. A single adult ticket to a public pool increased by 6 per cent and will now cost ISK 1,330 [$10, €9]. Yearly tickets go up by 5.5 per cent, while prices for towel and swimming trunk rentals also rise. 

A hike in bus fare prices for the public transport company Strætó has also been announced. Stræto operates the city buses in the Reykjavík capital region. They will rise by an average of 11 per cent with a single ticket now costing ISK 630  [$4.60, €4.20] from ISK 570 [$4.20, €3.80]. The increase has been justified by citing higher fuel prices. The buses outside the capital area are not affected by those changes.

Úlfarsárdalur swimming pool Dagur B. Eggertsson mayor

Tax rates on substances & electric vehicles increase

Municipalities have also upped the fees for some of the services they offer, while the 2024 budget, recently approved by Alþingi, heralds new taxes and adjustments to the existing ones. Tax rates on alcohol and tobacco go up by 3.5 per cent, Morgunblaðið reports. As does the licensing fee for public broadcasting and the gasoline tax. 

The litre will cost an extra ISK 4.20 [$0.03, €0.03], while the litre of diesel goes up by ISK 3.70 [$0.03, €0.02]. The vehicle tax on lighter automobiles rises by 30 per cent as well, while owners of electric cars will need to pay a new fee per kilometre, which for the average driver will amount to ISK 90,000 [$666, €599] per year. 

Owners of hybrid, electric and hydrogen vehicles will now need to keep track of the mileage of their vehicles and register them on island.is in the beginning of 2024. This procedure must be repeated once a year. The Icelandic government decided to implement this change due to a stark decrease in the state’s revenue from vehicles since 2018 and the ongoing need for the development of road infrastructure. The kilometre fee will be paid monthly. People concerned by this change can visit the government-run website Vegir okkar allra to find out more about this change.

Keflavík Airport
Keflavík Airport

EU travel fee not coming into effect until 2025

The by the EU announced ETIAS waiver program that was initially announced to come into effect in 2024 has been postponed to 2025. So travellers from outside of the EU are not facing registration fees of $7.70 / €7.00 just yet. ETIAS travel authorisation is an entry requirement for visa-exempt travellers who are visiting one of the thirty participating European countries. The entry requirement is valid for up to 90 days in any 180 days. Travellers intending to visit Iceland will also need an ETIAS travel authorisation to enter Iceland from 2025 on. This system will not replace visa requirements for citizens who currently require a visa to visit any EU country, like travellers from China, India and South Africa. 

A central database which will track non-EU residents when entering any EU country called the Entry/Exit system, will presumably come into force in the second half of 2024.

 

Can I bring my family to Iceland on a student visa?

Háskóli Íslands University of Iceland

In short, yes. If you have a residence permit as a student you can bring your family to Iceland with you. There, however, some rules which you can find below.

Obtaining a student visa yourself

People who are not from the European Economic Area (EEA) or EFTA (Iceland, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and want to study in Iceland for more than three months are obliged to file for a student residence permit. Usually, the student residence permit is valid depending on their enrolment and ability to financially support themselves. So if you can prove higher means of financial support, your permit will also be issued for longer.

To be eligible for a student permit, you must be 18 years and older (exchange students may be younger), and be admitted into studies that are recognised by the Directorate of Immigration. Those can be full-time studies at an Icelandic university, postgraduate studies at a university outside of Iceland that collaborates with an Icelandic university, exchange programmes, internships where working in Iceland is part of your studies, and technical studies at higher education institutions.

Útlendingastofnun directorate of immigration iceland
The Directorate of Immigration

You should apply for a residence permit for your studies before June 1 for the autumn semester and before November 1 for the spring semester each year. That way there is enough time for the permit to be processed before the semester commences. The application form can be accessed via Island.is and needs to be submitted in paper form to the Directorate of Immigration. Before handing in the application, you also need to pay a processing fee of ISK 16,000 for your application to go through.

In your application for a student residence permit, you need to show that you have enough financial resources for your entire stay. So if you stay for one year, you also need to prove that you can support yourself for that time. In your application, you need to attach a transcript from your bank account with the specific amount. The Directorate of Immigration has specific requirements for how much money is needed for an individual to live in Iceland. For an individual, the minimum amount required is ISK 217,799 per month [EUR 1,441 / USD 1,604].

Bringing the whole family to Iceland

According to the Directorate of Immigration, you have the right to bring your marital spouse or your cohabiting spouse (defined as a cohabiting partner of at least one year). If you have children under 18 and have custody of them, you are also allowed to bring them to Iceland. Likewise, if your parents are over the age of 67, you also have the right to family reunification with them.

In order to have all the paperwork sorted, your family members need to apply for a residence permit to the Directorate of Immigration. This can only be done in paper form to the address of the Immigration office. Additionally, they also need to pay a processing fee of ISK 16,000. To bring your entire family to Iceland, you need to prove that you can financially support them for their entire stay. 

For a couple, this means a minimum monthly amount of ISK 348,476 [EUR 2,306 / USD 2,566] and another ISK 108,898 [EUR 720 / USD 802] for every additional family member above the age of 18. For children under 18, there are no requirements for providing independent financial support. It is important to note that payments in the form of social assistance, alimony payments, support by a third party, assets other than bank account balances (e.g. real estate) and cash are not considered secure means of support.

What costs can you expect?

So if you’re thinking of bringing your spouse, your parent and your two kids to Iceland with you while you’re studying you should expect to be able to prove a minimum monthly budget of ISK 457,374 [EUR 3,027 / USD 3,368]. if you intend to stay for one year and also receive a student permit for that timeframe, you need to multiply that amount by twelve. So in total, you need to be able to showcase a whopping 5,5 Mio. ISK [EUR 36,312 / USD 40,416] on your bank account. 

Please keep in mind that this is merely the minimum amount required by the Directorate of Immigration for your application to be processed. Housing and living in Iceland are rather expensive. So don’t expect too comfortable of a lifestyle with those funds! You better start saving early.

You can find out more on the website of the Directorate of Immigration here. Read more about how to move to Iceland here.

In Pursuit of Ptarmigan

ptarmigan hunt iceland

It’s 6:00 AM and the obsidian darkness lingers outside my windshield. I arrive in the Kársnes neighbourhood of Kópavogur, park my car, and hop into Kristján Andri Einarsson’s black Jimny. The hunter greets me with a boyish smirk, ready for today’s adventure. He is wearing a camouflage cap on his greying auburn hair. Until this […]

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In Focus: The 2023 Women’s Strike

women's strike 2023

On October 24, 2023, thousands of people swarmed Arnarhóll hill in downtown Reykjavík, holding protesting signs, babies, and each other’s hands, turning the city centre into a historic spectacle. Iceland’s seventh Women’s Strike (Kvennaverkfall) had a much larger turnout than expected, with the crowd spilling out across Hverfisgata and Lækjargata streets. An estimated 70,000 to […]

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Deep North Episode 53: Reykjanes Update

Lava barrier Reykjanes

For this special episode, we break down the latest developments and give an overview of the situation on the Reykjanes Peninsula. 

What happens to the residents of Grindavík now? What lava barrier is currently built around the power plant Svartsengi, and what about the remaining animals in Grindavík? Tune in and find out.

Since the time of recording, the commercial banks have agreed to waive interest and indexation of mortgages for the next three months. Stay updated.