District Prosecutor Appeals Verdict in Hafnarfjörður Stabbing Case

Judge's gavel

The District Prosecutor is appealing the sentences of three young men involved in a fatal stabbing in Hafnarfjörður; a fourth individual, who recorded the incident, will not face an appeal on her suspended sentence, RÚV reports.

Fatal stabbing in front of Fjarðarkaup

In April of this year, four individuals, three of them under 18, were detained by the Capital Area Police following the death of a 27-year-old man in front of the Fjarðarkaup grocery store in Hafnarfjörður. The man had been stabbed multiple times.

All of the individuals were later sentenced to prison. The eldest of the four, a 19-year-old, was sentenced to 10 years in prison. The District Court ruled that he had not shown a deliberate intention to kill the victim. The other two boys, both under the age of 18, received two-year sentences. The fourth individual, a girl who recorded the attack on video, received a twelve-month suspended sentence.

As reported by RÚV, the District Prosecutor has decided to appeal to Landsréttur (i.e. the Court of Appeals) the verdict of the Reykjanes District Court against three young men. This was confirmed by Þorgils Þorgilsson, the defence attorney for one of them. According to RÚV, the verdict for the young woman who recorded the attack on video will not be appealed.

The Christmas Craftsman

laufabrauð christmas iceland

In the weeks leading up to Christmas, families and friends in Iceland come together to make the traditional fried and decorated wafer known as laufabrauð (leaf bread). Rolled out thin, decorated, and fried, the preparation of these treats is an event that brings together families, often with multiple generations taking part. But you won’t find […]

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Iceland’s Return to Handball World Stage Ends in Defeat

Stavanger, Norway

Iceland’s women’s handball team lost 30-24 to Slovenia in their first World Championship match in 12 years. The team will face Olympic champions France tomorrow.

First major tournament in 11 years

The Icelandic women’s national handball team suffered a 30-24 defeat against Slovenia in their opening match in Group D at the Women’s Handball World Championship in Stavanger, Norway yesterday. 

The game marked Iceland’s first appearance in a World Championship final in 12 years and their first in a major tournament in 11 years. 

The result increases the likelihood that Iceland and Angola will face off in a decisive match for a spot in the intermediate round in the final game of the group.

Comeback ultimately thwarted

As noted by Mbl.is, there was evident nervousness among the Icelandic players at the start of the game. Early mistakes in offence allowed Slovenia to capitalise with rapid counter-attacks, resulting in a significant early lead of 11-4. Iceland rallied impressively towards the end of the first half, closing the gap to 16-13 at halftime.

The teams exchanged goals in the second half, with Iceland putting on a strong mid-half performance to bring the score to a narrow 20-19. Despite this effort, Iceland couldn’t level the score, and Slovenia extended their lead to 24-20 with ten minutes left.

After a strategic timeout, Iceland managed to score two quick goals, cutting Slovenia’s lead to 24-22. But Slovenia’s three subsequent goals lessened Iceland’s chances of a reversal. Iceland’s valiant attempt to recover from a six-goal deficit proved insufficient against Slovenia’s experienced team, who leveraged their expertise in the game’s crucial moments.

Next up: the Olympic champions

Perla Ruth Albertsdóttir, Sandra Erlingsdóttir, and Thea Imani Sturludóttir each scored five goals for Iceland. Elín Rósa Magnúsdóttir scored four. Goalkeeper Elín Jóna Þorsteinsdóttir made nine saves in the Icelandic goal. 

Iceland’s next match in the group is against the Olympic champions, France, on Saturday.

Fatal Accident in Reykjanesbær, Investigation Underway

Small boat fishermen crowd the Arnarstapi harbour each summer for the coastal fishing season

A fatal workplace accident occurred yesterday at Fitjabraut in Reykjanesbær, Vísir reports. An investigation is currently underway.

Reports of a loud explosion

Yesterday morning, a fatal workplace accident occurred at Fitjabraut in Reykjanesbær. Vísir reports that police received a call about the incident at 11:27 AM, and emergency services quickly arrived at the scene.

“The responders confirmed upon arrival that the accident was fatal. An investigation is currently ongoing, and further details are not available at this moment,” stated the Suðurnes Police.

Vísir’s sources indicated that a loud explosion was heard at the time of the accident. Fitjabraut, where the incident took place, is mainly an industrial area located near Reykjanesbær’s harbour.

Grindavík Awaits End of Land Uplift for Return Home

Grindavík

Grindavík residents cannot return home until the ongoing land uplift ceases. Despite geological challenges, including a newly formed 25.7-meter-deep hole, Grindavík’s business sector is showing signs of revival.

Waiting on zero

Earlier this week, Víðir Reynisson, Head of the Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management, fielded questions from Grindavík residents on the news programme Torgið. When asked about the prospect of a homecoming, Víðir remarked that Grindavík residents would be unable to return home until land uplift — the geological process where the Earth’s surface rises due to tectonic activities like magma intrusion — in town ceases.

Víðir noted that the land was currently rising faster near the Svartsengi Geothermal Power Plant than before November 10, when the magma intrusion extended into Grindavík, necessitating the evacuation of the town. “This geological event is far from over,” Víðir observed.

According to Víðir, only when the land uplift had reached a zero point could any discussion of homecoming commence. “Only then can we possibly start counting some days until it can be declared safe to return home.”

A deep hole

Examples of how the ongoing land uplift is affecting Grindavík have been noticeable over the past few days. On Wednesday, a deep hole was discovered in one of the neighbourhoods in Grindavík. When RÚV arrived on the scene, Ármann Höskuldsson, a professor of volcanology at the University of Iceland, was conducting measurements:

“This hole exemplifies the cracks emerging in the area as the land shifts apart. Unlike solid rock, the soil doesn’t move in unison when it fractures, causing it to fill the cracks. The crack we’re examining is approximately 25.7 metres deep, reaching the water’s surface, which means it’s even deeper below the water,” Ármann explained. “Remarkably, the groundwater level here is at 25.7 metres depth, a significant depth for such cracks.”

The hole is part of an extensive fissure bisecting the town into eastern and western sections. Regarding the type of water at the bottom of the hole, Ármann was uncertain: “I haven’t tested it, but it’s likely just groundwater.”

Ármann expressed no alarm over the presence of groundwater in the hole. “Groundwater is a common feature beneath us, no matter where we are in this area … it’s not a cause for concern.”

Awaken, industry

Despite the challenges posed by holes, cracks, and other damages, Grindavík’s business sector is showing signs of revival. Fannar Jónasson, the town’s mayor, expressed optimism in a recent interview with Vísir.

“We’re seeing a variety of businesses expressing interest in reopening. With available housing and machinery for production and services, people are returning and taking advantage of these opportunities to keep their businesses afloat,” he stated.

Fannar emphasised the growing sense of community and mutual support in Grindavík.

“It’s great to see how supportive everyone is. Those working need access to food and services. There are also machine shops and wood workshops , among other businesses, which are reopening. So it is all interconnected, and life here is in its infancy, once again, ushering in what we hope marks the start of a positive era.”