Central Bank Announces 14th Consecutive Rate Hike

Central Bank

The Monetary Policy Committee of the Central Bank of Iceland announced this morning that it would be raising the policy rate by 0.50%. This is the fourteenth rate hike in a row, with the bank’s main interest rate currently sitting at 9.25%.

Inflation subsided slightly

In its fourteenth consecutive rate hike, the Central Bank announced this morning that it would be raising the key interest rate by 0.50%, bringing the bank’s main interest rate to 9.25%. The previous increase of 1.25% was announced in May.

According to the announcement, inflation has subsided somewhat – down to 7.6% in July – since the last interest rate decision. The short-term inflation outlook has improved. However, inflation expectations are still above the bank’s target of 2.5% and there is a risk that it will prove persistent. “In light of this, it is necessary to further tighten the reins of monetary policy. In particular, it is important to prevent the interaction of rising wages and prices.”

The announcement also notes that the housing component’s contribution to inflation has decreased, international price increases have decreased, and the exchange rate of the króna has increased. However, domestic price increases have proven to be persistent and are still on a broad basis. Underlying inflation has, therefore, decreased more slowly than measured inflation; it was 6.7% in July.

Governor calls on the government to exercise “prudence”

In a press conference following the announcement, Þórarinn G. Pétursson, Chief Economist at the Central Bank, noted that the number of jobs is increasing rapidly; during the second quarter of the year, the unemployment rate was 2.8%, the lowest since the fall of 2017. The number of companies in search of employees is decreasing, Þórarinn noted, although the percentage was still well above the historical average.

Þórarinn also noted that economic growth was lower than the Central Bank expected in May. The same held for private consumption: 5% when the Central Bank had forecast expected almost 7%. The difference is mainly in Icelanders’ spending abroad, which turned out to be less significant than expected.

Governor of the Central Bank Ásgeir Jónsson emphasised that a fifty-point hike in the interest rate was significant. The economy remained strained, with wages witnessing a 10% rise year-on-year and notable surges in domestic product prices. According to Ásgeir, the Central Bank has already made substantial interest rate adjustments, and its impact will be closely monitored. The upcoming Monetary Policy Committee meeting is just around the corner.

Regarding next year’s budget proposal, Ásgeir mentioned that the Central Bank did not have specific requests. However, they hope the government exercises utmost prudence in its operations.

Read More: A Króna for Your Thoughts (Interview with Governor of the Central Bank Ásgeir Jónsson)