Direct Flights to be Offered Between Zürich and Akureyri

edelweiss airline akureyri

Edelweiss, a Swiss airline, has announced that it will be offering direct flights between Zürich and Akureyri for a seven-week period this coming summer.

The flights will run from July 7 to August 18, but the airline has also announced plans to introduce a longer 4-month long route in the summer of 2024, if the route proves popular.

See also: Play Adds Routes to Stockholm, Hamburg

The route will be serviced by an Airbus A320, which is capable of carrying some 174 passengers.

In a press release, Edelweiss airline stated: “Akureyri is the ideal starting point for visiting the highlights of Iceland and can also be perfectly combined with flights to Keflavik. The airport in the north of the country is served every Friday.”

The new route is just one new addition in an attempt to increase international connections to the North of Iceland. German airline Condor has also announced new routes to Akureyri in the summer, giving travelers to Iceland more choices than previous, in addition to opening up a new region of the country to tourism.

Four Added to List for Honorary Artists’ Stipend

Alþingi Icelandic parliament

Four artists are to be added to the list of honorary artists who received a state stipend to support their work. The decision comes from the Cultural Committee of Parliament, and the four new artists are replacing four who have passed on either this year or last.

The new recipients of the artist stipend will be: Hildur Hákonardóttir, Kristín Þorkelsdóttir, Manfreð Vilhjálmsson, and Þórhildur Þorleifsdóttir.

The list of honorary artists is notable this year for including graphic designers and architects. Historically, the list has generally been reserved for the traditional fine arts, including visual art, music, and theatre.

Kristín Þorkelsdóttir is noteworthy as the graphic designer behind some Icelandic banknotes and the Icelandic passport.

The new honorary artists will be joining the ranks of notable Icelandic creatives such as Erró, Bubbi Morthens, and Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, among others. In total, the list includes some 25 notable Icelandic artists who have contributed in a significant way to Icelandic culture.

The new additions to the honorary artists’ stipend are in line with a a budget proposal which was passed yesterday.

 

Reykjavík City Lowers Speed Limit on More than 150 Streets

Aerial view of Reykjavík city traffic during winter

The 50 km/h speed limit common on many Reykjavík city streets will soon be a thing of the past, as speed limits throughout the city are to be lowered.

New speed limits will be either 30 or 40 km/h on many roads throughout the capital region.

See also: Reykjavík to Cap Speed Limits

The changes which are to be implemented were agreed upon in April of this year. However, the changes are expected to take much of the coming year, so Reykjavík motorists will have some time to adjust.

Notably, however, the changes will not apply to roads that are operated by authorities other than Reykjavík city. Many major arterial roads, such as Sæbraut, Kringlumýrarbraut, Miklabraut, Hringbraut, and Reykjanesbraut are administered by the Icelandic Road Administration, and will not be affected by the new, lower, limits.

The goal of the reduced speed limits is to promote road safety within the city.

For a complete overview of the affected streets, see RÚV.

PM Katrín Jakobsdóttir Condemns “Unacceptable” Practices by Landlords

In recent statement, PM Katrín Jakobsdóttir has condemned what she called “unacceptable” practices on behalf of Icelandic landlords and real estate companies.

Following her comments, work is expected to begin soon on reforming tenancy rights. MPs from the Left Greens, the Social Democratic Alliance, and the People’s Party have suggested that measures needed to be taken, potentially including a rent ceiling.

See also: Government Announces Increased Benefits

While Katrín did not specifically name any one real estate company, her comments follow recent news of one real estate company, Alma, raising rents by nearly a third in renewals for next year, potentially putting lower-income and fixed-income residents out on the street.

Katrín is quoted as saying: “I fully understand these demands in light of the recent conduct of some rental companies, which we have seen examples of in the media. Their conduct is completely unacceptable, as has been clearly stated. I have encouraged the rental companies to take responsibility and show moderation when they determine their rental prices in order to help us deal with inflation.”

Katrín and other ministers are expected to meet with members of the labour market in the coming days to discuss measures that can be taken.