Six National Team Players Accused of Violence and Sexual Assault

football

Six members of Iceland’s men’s national football team have been accused of sexual assault. The board of the Football Association of Iceland received a confidential email from activist group Öfgar naming six members of the team and dates of their alleged violent and sexual offences, according to mbl.is sources. The national team coach was also accused of belittling the alleged victims in the wording of his statements to media.

Aron Einar Gunnarsson, Kolbeinn Sigþórsson, and Gylfi Þór Sigurðsson have all been named in Icelandic media in relation to violent or sexual offences. The other three players remain unnamed. The players will not play on the national team while the cases are being investigated.

Read More: Football Association Accused of Silencing Sexual Assault

Sigurbjörg Sigurpálsdóttir, Sports and Youth Activities Communication Counselor is overseeing the investigation. Her position was created last spring under the auspices of the Ministry of Education and Culture to address bullying and violence in sports and youth activities and to “contribute to a safe environment within sports and youth activities” as per the position’s official website.

Editor’s note: This article has been updated with a more accurate photo.

Iceland’s First Lady Asks: Do Women Exist?

Eliza Reid Guðni Th. Frederik Crown Prince Denmark

Iceland’s First Lady Eliza Reid graced the cover of Morgunblaðið newspaper today, yet her name was not mentioned anywhere in the accompanying text. The cover photo features her shaking hands with Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark, as he arrived in Iceland yesterday. Both the Prince and President of Iceland Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, who is also in the photo, are named in the text but Eliza’s name is left out. Eliza shared a picture of the cover on her Facebook page today with the hashtag #dowomenexist.

“Summary of this photo caption on the cover of the newspaper today: One man with a name came to dinner at another man with a name’s house. With the visitor was a third man with a name [not pictured]. That is all. #dowomenexist” Eliza wrote.

https://www.facebook.com/elizajeanreid/posts/406342764389133

This is far from the first time Eliza speaks out about sexism. In 2019, she addressed the expectation that diplomats’ “unelected, unpaid” spouses will accompany their partners to official functions, writing: “I am not my husband’s handbag, to be snatched as he runs out the door and displayed silently by his side during public appearances.”

COVID-19 in Iceland: Moderna Vaccine Used for 60+

COVID-19 vaccine vaccination Iceland

Iceland’s Chief Epidemiologist announced yesterday that the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine will only be used for booster shots among those 60 and older. Health authorities in Iceland temporarily suspended use of the Moderna vaccine on October 8, 2021 after data from Nordic countries showed an increased likelihood of cardiac inflammation as a side effect of the drug. The Chief Epidemiologist stated that the decision would be reviewed if new data emerges suggesting the vaccine is safe for younger demographics.

“Unpublished data from the Nordic countries indicate that the risk of cardiac inflammation after vaccination against COVID-19 is much higher among 18 to 39-year-olds if the Moderna vaccine is used than after vaccination with the Pfizer vaccine.” the announcement reads. “Cardiac inflammation after vaccination is much less common among older demographics. It should be noted that the use of the Moderna vaccine in 12 to 17-year-olds is much lower than the use of the Pfizer vaccine in Europe and no comparison of the safety of the vaccines in that age group has been made in this study.”

Over 75% of Iceland’s population has been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, including over 60% of those 12-15 years old (the youngest eligible demographic). Icelandic health authorities have begun administering booster shots to vulnerable populations and healthcare workers. Those under 60 who have received a single shot of Moderna will be invited to complete their vaccination with a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. Men 18-39 are not recommended to accept the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

Just over 20,000 residents of Iceland have been fully vaccinated with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. Data shows that the vast majority of vaccination side effects emerge shortly after vaccination takes place.

Seyðisfjörður Residents May Return Home

The evacuation order in Seyðisfjörður, East Iceland has been lifted and the alert phase due to landslide risk has been lowered to an uncertainty phase, the Civil Protection Department announced in a notice sent to media yesterday afternoon. According to calculations presented on October 11, the deflecting and catching dams above the town should divert any landslides toward the sea and prevent damage to buildings in the town. Residents living in the defined risk area have thus been permitted to return to their homes.

A series of landslides destroyed 14 buildings, including residential homes, in Seyðisfjörður last December. Around 20 residents were evacuated earlier this month after movement was detected in a mountain ridge above the town. That movement has slowed in recent days, according to the Civil Protection Department. However, fissures have formed in the ridge, increasing the likelihood it will break apart. “If it falls, it will probably do so in a few sections,” the notice states. “This can be expected during a rainy period sometime in the near future.”

Even if the ridge falls all at once, calculations showed the existing barriers should divert the resulting landslide away from the town. In light of that information, East Iceland Police has lifted the evacuation order on the remaining five houses that were still evacuated and lowered the alert phase placed on the area to an uncertainty phase. Hikers are reminded to exercise caution on the paths near Búðará and other locations where the barriers divert potential landslides.

The Icelandic Met Office provides regular updates on data collected in the area.